Thomas Jefferson: An Intimate History

By Fawn M. Brodie | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XX

Disillusionment in Eden

These mountains are the Eden of the United States....

Jefferson to the Comte de Volney, April 9, 1797 1

The most mysterious of all periods in Jefferson's life was his three‐ year retirement at Monticello, from his arrival in early January 1794 to his departure for Philadelphia as vice-president-elect in February 1797. Henry Randall wrote long ago that many believed his declarations on his retirement "were pure pretences—unfelt—and only designed to play off a stale game to deceive the public, while he was busy as a spider secretly weaving his political webs; setting on foot political machinations to favor his own progress to the Presidency ... dictating all the secret arrangements of his party." 2 This faithful biographer denied it all, holding that zeal for office was not characteristic of the time, and that Washington himself had no affection even for the presidency. The old suspicion has come down to us, however, especially in the biography of Nathan Schachner, who described Jefferson's renunciation of politics as largely "pretense." 3

There can be no question that Jefferson really believed in the finality of his retirement, as the barrage of letters he sent to his friends trumpeting this finality attests, though the very thoroughness with which he burned his bridges is evidence of his own recognition of the seductive power of politics which had so often in the past enticed him back. He abandoned newspaper subscriptions, and let his letters, which normally poured out in a daily stream, shrink to a mere trickle. To the new Secretary of State, his friend Edmund Randolph, he wrote wryly and with just a hint of shame on February 3, 1794, "I

-276-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Thomas Jefferson: An Intimate History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 594

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.