The Nemesis of Power: The German Army in Politics, 1918-1945

By John W. Wheeler-Bennett | Go to book overview

CHRONOLOGY

1918
Sept. 29. Hindenburg and Ludendorff demand an Armistice.
Oct. 23. Wilson's Third Note stating that if the Allies had to treat with
'the military authorities and the Monarchical autocrats of Germany
. . . they would demand not negotiations for peace but surrender'.
26. Ludendorff resigns.
Nov. 9.German Republic proclaimed in Berlin. The Kaiser leaves Spa
for Holland.
9-10.The Gröner-Ebert Pact.10.Representatives of Soldiers' Councils received at Spa.11.Armistice signed at Réthondes.28.Foundation of the German Officers' Association.
Dec. 7.G.H.Q. transferred to Cassell.8. Hindenburg's letter to Ehert ratifying Gröner-Ebert Pact.9. Schleicher's visit to Ebert to demand the entry of Lequis's troops
into Berlin to disarm the revolutionaries.
11.Ebert greets returning troops at Brandenburger Tor.16.Congress of Soldiers' Councils at Berlin. First crisis between
G.H.Q. and Ebert. Formation of National Association of German
Officers.
23. Ebert besieged in Chancellery by Naval Division.24. General Lequis fails to dislodge Naval Division from the Royal
Stables.
27. Noske appointed Minister of Defence. Gröner agrees to support
Noske on condition that Independent Socialists leave the Govern-
ment.

1919
Jan. 6.Government appeal for recruits for the Free Corps.10-17. Noske and the Free Corps suppress the Spartakists.15.Murder of Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg by Free Corps
Officers.
16.Government Ordinance regulating Soldiers' Councils.19.Elections for the National Assembly held throughout Germany.
Ordinance on reorganization of the R/W (Reichswehr).
Feb. 6.National Assembly opens at Weimar.
Mar. 2-9. Noske and the Free Corps suppress the Rising
in Berlin.
Apr. 27-May 3.R/W and Free Corps suppress revolutionary Government
in Bavaria.
May 7.Allied peace terms published in Berlin.
June 3-4.Secret Cabinet sessions on acceptance of terms.16.Allied ultimatum on acceptance

-756-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Nemesis of Power: The German Army in Politics, 1918-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 832

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.