A Social History of Nineteenth-Century France

By Roger Price | Go to book overview

7

Religion

Religious life has to be examined at a number of levels: in relation to the structure and teachings of established churches; at the level of the parish in which clergy and people interrelate; and most difficult of all, in terms of the beliefs of the population.


The Roman Catholic Church

According to the official census of 1872, of a population of 36 million, 35,387,703 were Roman Catholics, under 600,000 Protestants, 50,000 Jews and 80,000 freethinkers. Although, as will become evident, these statistics have many shortcomings, they justify the emphasis placed in this chapter upon analysis of the Roman Catholic Church as an institution and upon the relationships of its clergy with the wider society.


Parish clergy

The revolution had been a disaster for the church. Between 1790 and 1802 recruitment of priests had been virtually suspended. Subsequently, it averaged only 350-500 per annum during the empire, so that in 1814 there were only 35,952 priests in France, half of the number in 1789, and of these almost 11,000 were over 60. Of some 23,000 churches, 3345 had no priest. During the restoration, encouraged by increased stipends and obvious government favour, and by the development of the network of church schools and seminaries the number of ordinations constantly increased, from 918 in 1815 to 2357 in 1830; reducing the percentage of sexagenarians from 42 per cent to 32 per cent. By 1830 there were 4655 more clergy than in 1814, in spite ofhigh mortality among the many aged priests. Subsequently, the number ofordinands declined, falling to 1095 by 1845. This in part reflected a deterioration of state-church relationships. However, between 1845 and 1851 there was some recovery, with the average annual number of ordinations rising to 1295 and then stabilizing at around 1310 between 1852 and 1860. Indeed, throughout the Second Empire, encouraged by government assistance and active recruitment the overall num

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Social History of Nineteenth-Century France
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • A Social History of Nineteenth-Century France *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgements *
  • Introduction *
  • Part One - A Changing Environment *
  • 1 - The Economy: Continuity and Change *
  • 2 - The Demographic Indicators *
  • Part Two - Social Relationships *
  • 3 - Elites *
  • 4 - The Middle Classes *
  • 5 - Peasants *
  • 6 - Urban Working Classes *
  • Part Three - Social Institutions *
  • 7 - Religion *
  • 8 - Education *
  • 9 - In Conclusion: State and Society *
  • Notes and References *
  • Select Bibliography *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 403

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.