Ethnic Conflict in the Post-Soviet World: Case Studies and Analysis

By Leokadia Drobizheva; Rose Gottemoeller et al. | Go to book overview

ABOUT WIIS AND WINGS

Women in International Security (WIIS) is an international non-partisan educational program and professional network, dedicated to the advancement of women in the field of foreign and defense policy, international security studies broadly defined. Founded in 1987 by Catherine McArdle Kelleher, WIIS offers a comprehensive set of programs designed to educate the international community about the roles and contributions of women working in the field of international security. The program includes women in the military, in government, in policymaking and diplomatic areas, private enterprise, academia, and the mass media. Ongoing seminar series and conferences provide mechanisms for women to contribute directly to the international security dialogue. The WIIS (pronounced "wise") computerized databank includes nearly 4,000 listings world-wide. WIIS publications offer professional development and substantive information. Programs such as the annual Summer Symposium for Graduate Studies of International Affairs, and the WIIS Post-Doctoral Fellowship, contribute to building the next generation of international security policy leadership.

Women in Global Security (WINGS) was established in 1990, under the leadership of Dr. Leokadia Drobizheva of the Institute for Ethnography and Anthropology at the Russian Academy of Sciences, based on the major principles of the Committee of Soviet Scientists. WINGS aims to support women scholars involved in a broad range of global security issues; to enhance professional prospects of both senior researchers and women at the beginning and mid-point of their careers; and to encourage women to contribute to international scientific collaboration. The women of WINGS have been helpful to Western researchers by generously using their network to ensure that visiting scholars gain better knowledge of and access to the rapidly changing scholarly and political structures throughout the former Soviet Union.

Since 1990, WIIS and WINGS have collaborated on a series of conference projects focused on ethnic conflict in East Central Europe and the former Soviet Union. Supported by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the International Research and Exchanges Board (IREX), and the U. S. Institute of Peace, this work has resulted in a series of case studies and a deepened understanding of ethnic conflict and security relationships in the region.

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