Rachid Ghannouchi: A Democrat within Islamism

By Azzam S. Tamimi | Go to book overview

1
From Qabis to Paris

In the Village

In a bunker in a small village close to Hamma in the province of Gabès in southeastern Tunisia, Rachid Ghannouchi was born on 22 June 1941. His family, together with several others, had been sheltering from the bombardment of the Axis powers during World War II. It was a time of turmoil, confusion, and imminent transformation.

The tribes of the region had been rebelling against the French colonizers since before the war. By 9 April 1938, the day anti-French demonstrations were organized throughout the country, the tribal uprising had reached the political elite, injecting it with courage and hope after having ignited the people's passion for independence. When France and Britain responded to the German invasion of Poland with a declaration of war on 3 September 1939, French colonial authorities in Tunisia had been struggling to contain a situation that threatened to get out of hand. Hundreds of Tunisians had been arrested and scores of their leaders banished. However, by the end of June 1940 France collapsed and surrendered to the Germans and a new French puppet regime was set up at Vichy. The impact on the Tunisians was enormous. They saw with their own eyes the downfall of a colonial power that to them was arrogant and confident. France, which claimed political, military, and cultural superiority, had been vanquished by Germany, which, being the enemy of Tunisia's enemy, had been seen by many as the new friend of Tunisia. Since then and until the end of the war, Tunisia had come under the control of the pro-German Vichy regime. In spite of mixed feelings among members of the political elite, this was a period of relative relief. Bey Muhammad el-Muncef, who acceded to the throne on 19 June 1942, resisted pressure from both the Axis powers and the Allies to take sides in the war. He identified with the grievances of his people and sought the release of activists detained inside Tunisia or outside it in Algeria or France. His reign witnessed renewed political activism and the return to Tunisia of a number of banished political leaders including Bourguiba, who returned to the country on 7 April 1943. As the Bey was engaged in consultation with the New Desturian Party to form a new cabinet that would have included Bourguiba and Saleh bin Yousef, Allied troops defeated the Germans and conquered Tunis, the capital, on 7 May 1943. On 13 May,

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rachid Ghannouchi: A Democrat within Islamism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Religion and Global Politics *
  • Title Page *
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents *
  • Rachid Ghannouchi *
  • 1 - From Qabis to Paris 3
  • 2 - The Journey to Democracy 30
  • 3 - The Question of Democracy 63
  • 4 - Secularism 105
  • 5 - Civil Society 125
  • 6 - The Territorial State and the New World Order 154
  • 7 - Islamist Obstacles to Democracy 182
  • 8 - Ghannouchi's Detractors 200
  • Conclusion 215
  • Notes 221
  • Bibliography 247
  • Index 259
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 268

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.