Succeeding in Graduate School: The Career Guide for Psychology Students

By Steven Walfish; Allen K. Hess | Go to book overview

19
Learning Consulting Skills
Rodney L. Lowman

Consulting. The images conjured up in starving psychology graduate students' minds by that word may include thoughts of riches and a pleasant and comfortable lifestyle fueled by the fires of sagaciously imparted expertise. The dream is of a professional lifestyle generating both respect and financial comfort—and derived from doing what one loves to do. This is not such a bad image. Such thoughts can sustain graduate student efforts through many a bad or self-questioning night. But like the fantasy-fueled dream of the pristine beach coast or the riches after rags, the anticipated view does not always match the reality. There are clearly many exciting and rewarding careers to have in psychological consulting in which it is possible both to make a good—and for some a very good—living and to make a positive contribution to the world. However consulting is not necessarily an easy or assuredly profitable career path. It is certainly the preferred scenario that the desire to consult matches the student's passions, preferences and talents.

Somewhere between the imagined riches of consulting and an anticipated future in the managed care graveyard lies the reality of psychological consulting. It is not an exaggeration to say that the nature and scope of clinical and counseling psychology are in the process of radical change. This change is mostly dictated by environmental factors on both the supply and the demand side. Increasingly, clinical/counseling psychologists are by necessity, if not by choice, forced to find new applications for their skills. Inevitably, perhaps, such psychologists have contemplated applying their clinical skills to business and industry. There are indeed substantial opportunities for the successful application of psychology to work organizations but there are also many pitfalls (see, Lowman, 1998a, 1988c). In this chapter I outline some of the types of consulting applications commonly found, including discussion of both the opportunities and the risks that go along with these uses of psychology.

-263-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Succeeding in Graduate School: The Career Guide for Psychology Students
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 400

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.