Detection Theory: A User's Guide

By Neil A. Macmillan; C. Douglas Creelman | Go to book overview

6
Detection and Discrimination
of Compound Stimuli: Tools for
Multidimensional Detection Theory

In Flatland, Abbott's (1991/1884) classic mathematical fantasy, a two-dimensional world is visited by someone from the third dimension who shows an eager acolyte the splendors of 3D. So far we have described a one-dimensional psychological world that even flatlanders would disdain: Sensation, familiarity, and other such dimensions have been the single subjective variables involved. For the initial applications of detection theory to auditory and visual detection, the idea that a single variable—subjective intensity— characterized the decision process was quite reasonable. We saw in chapter 5 that some apparently more complex problems such as false memory and social judgment can be interpreted unidimensionally as well.

The problems we consider in this chapter are the detection and discrimination of “compound” stimuli, that is, those with two or more perceptually distinct components. The key questions are whether these “cues” are combined by the observer and, if so, in what way. Treisman (1998) offers some nonlaboratory examples: To decide whether there is an aircraft in the sky (a detection task) or whether the aircraft is a plane or a helicopter (discrimination), one may rely on visual appearance or the quality of sound it produces. In assessing the degree of impairment of a particular patient, a clinician's judgment may be based both on a deficiency in movement control and signs of disordered thought. The question may be whether impairment exists (detection) or what type of impairment it is (discrimination). Cues may be in conflict or in agreement, and how they are best combined is a complex problem. Should the nature of combination change, in the plane-spotting example, if clouds limit the view or traffic noise masks the auditory signal?

-141-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Detection Theory: A User's Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 492

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.