Detection Theory: A User's Guide

By Neil A. Macmillan; C. Douglas Creelman | Go to book overview

III
Stimulus Factors

One way to characterize the shift in the attitude of psychologists toward their work that came with the cognitive revolution is as a decline in interest in “the stimulus. ” In the behaviorist period, understanding the effect of presenting a conditioned or unconditioned stimulus, or a reward, was central, and that effect was usually a more or less overt “response. ” In the cognitive era, the focus has shifted to representations and processing, both nonobservable, and in this respect detection theory is a prototypical cognitive enterprise. In this book, we have repeatedly asked how experimental situations are represented internally, and what sorts of decision processes are applied to them. Details of the stimuli being used have been missing, and in our treatment of data they have not been missed.

This story line is too simple, however, and in the next two chapters we look at two important detection theory scripts that offer the stimulus a lead role. Chapter 11, “Adaptive Methods for Estimating Empirical Thresholds, ” summarizes strategies for determining a stimulus whose detectability or discriminability is at a preset level. Finding the stimulus corresponding to a performance level is the inverse of the one-dimension problems in Part I and assumes the same kinds of representations. The stimulus sets to which adaptive methods have most often been applied are simple perceptual ones, although advancing technology is broadening the scope.

Chapter 12, “Components of Sensitivity, ” is an introduction to the use of detection theory in partitioning discriminability between the stimulus and its processing, and among different types of processing. One of the first applications of SDT was in comparing the performance of human listeners to ideal observers, hypothetical processors who make optimal use of the information in the stimulus in making their decisions. In this early work, sensory applications dominated, but more recently the approach has advanced into cognitive and even social domains.

-267-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Detection Theory: A User's Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 492

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.