History and Functions of Central Labor Unions

By William Maxwell Burke | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II.
ORGANIZATION.

I. Rise of Central Labor Unions.

IN the history of labor in the United States there are three distinct periods in the development of that form of organization known for the most part as the Central Labor Union. We have already stated what is known of the first period, which extends from the beginning of the labor movement to the close of the Civil War. Very few records have been left of this period, principally because they belonged to no general organization which would be interested in keeping account of them. Sometimes we know that they existed by the work they accomplished, or attempted, either in legislation or in organization or in assisting strikes and boycotts. In other cases we hear of them through the daily press on the occasion of a parade or Independence-day celebration. On the whole, the information which can be obtained is very slight. Their existence was confined to the largest cities, and here it was not at all continuous. Delegate bodies would come together and work with one special object in view. When this object was attained, or when it was seen that it could not be attained, the Committee or body of delegates would disband, to be formed again when some glaring wrong in the city or community showed itself, or when some man or men more enthusiastic or with more than ordinary ability entered the labor movement through the local union.

After the war, laborers all over the United States became imbued with a spirit of organization, local unions by the

-40-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
History and Functions of Central Labor Unions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 125

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.