Mass Media and Drug Prevention: Classic and Contemporary Theories and Research

By William D. Crano; Michael Burgoon | Go to book overview

Subject Index

A
Accentuating the positive, 45
Adobe Premier®, 73
Adolescent Alcohol Prevention Trial, 223
A// Quiet on the Western Front, 20
All the President's Men, 264
Ambiguous recommendation, 48
Ambivalence, 11, 144
American Cancer Society, 258
American Lung Association 258
Asymetrix ToolBook£, 73
Attention, 117, 172
Attentional shiff. 169
Attitude, defined. 143
Attitudinal ambivalence, 11, 144
Audience receptivity, 40

B
Ballweber. C., xiv
Behavioral intention, 199
Birth of a Nation, 20
Body Awareness Resource Network (BARN), 68, 69
Boomerang effects 36, 37, 46

C
Channeling concepts. 51
Claremont Graduate University, xiii
Claremont McKenna College, xiii
Clinton, B., 273
Columbia University Bureau of Applied Social Research, 19
Communications Act of 1934, 262, 263
Communicator reward valence, 168, 170
Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System (CHESS), 70
Continuity devices, 58
Copper law, 216
Core1 PhotoPaint®, 73
Cost-benefit ratio, 14
Crystal, B., 259

D
D. A. R. E., 12, 189, 190, 216, 217
David, S., xiv
Design sensitivity problem, 217
Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), 187, 188
Direct effects model, 20
Directon®, 73
Dissemination, 233
Dissertation Abstracts Online, 238
Department of Education, 188
Dobbs, M., xiv
Don't always say don't, 45
Drug Information Assessment and Decisions for Schools (DIADS), 71

E
Edutainment, 28, 53
Effect size, 236, 238
Effectiveness research, 214, 215
Efficacy research, 214, 215
Efficacy trial, 79
Elaboration likelihood, 44
Eliminate the negative, 56
Equal appearing interval scale, 21
ERIC, 238
EST, see Expectancy states theory
Evaluative tension 144–149, 152, 153, 156, 157
and attitude extremity, 150

-299-

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