Writing in the Academic Disciplines: A Curricular History

By David R. Russell | Go to book overview

PREFACE TO THE
SECOND EDITION

I have been very gratified that many faculty and writing-across‐ the-curriculum program coordinators from around North America have told me over the last ten years that they found the first edition of this book interesting and, at times, useful. That response shows me that they feel the need for a sense of history as they work to help students learn to write and write to learn. But the last ten years have also impressed upon me the immense variety and scope of WAC—and thus how incomplete this book is. I have often wished that I could thoroughly revise and expand it, to give a more complete account. Yet others have gone a long way in doing that, in many ways relieving me of the task.

In the last decade, there has been some excellent research on the history of WAC, which fills in important gaps. A few examples : The role of WAC in historically black colleges has been traced by Zaluda; community college WAC was researched by Ambron; and efforts to teach professional writing have been chronicled by several, most notably Adams.

Of course there have been myriad efforts to improve students' communication across the curriculum that have not yet been researched, and I hope that historical research will expand, as it provides an important perspective on current efforts and new visions for future efforts. For example, there is much pioneering and important work in WAC during the 1970s and 1980s that

-xiii-

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