Women's Religions in the Greco-Roman World: A Sourcebook

By Ross Shepard Kraemer | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Many people contributed to the production of this new edition, which was originally published by Fortress Press in 1988 as Maenads, Martyrs, Matrons, Monastics: A Sourcebook on Women's Religions in the Greco-Roman World. Carolyn Osiek and Janet Timbie gave me permission again to include their respective translations of selections from Epiphanius and Shenoute's Letter to Tachom. Leigh Gibson, Lynn LiDonnici, and others suggested formatting changes based on their classroom experiences with the original edition. Deb Bucher provided invaluable bibliographic assistance. Mary Rose D'Angelo and Susan Ashbrook Harvey critiqued the revised introductions. Jesse Goodman, Luke Meier, and Heidi Wendt checked references, read proofs, and prepared the index of female names. Kathleen Pappas and Gail Tetreault provided crucial support with correspondence and other time-consuming clerical tasks. Cynthia Read and Theo Calderera at Oxford provided encouragement, advice, and assistance from the inception of this project on.

The introductions to the sections and selections throughout this book are studded with insights and ideas gained through my work with the graduate students at Penn, especially Deb Bucher, Lynn Cohick, Maxine Grossman, Shira Lander, Susan Marks, Jacqueline Pastis, Beth Pollard, and Sarah Schwarz. They are my “spiritual children, ” and I trust they know it.

One more time, I want to thank my colleagues in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Pennsylvania for their extraordinary support and collegiality over twenty-five years. Equally, I want to thank my colleagues and students at Brown University, for affording me an opportunity at this stage of my career beyond anything I might have imagined or wished for.

Finally, as always, I want to thank my family: my husband, Michael, my daughter, Jordan, and my wonderful parents-in-law, Honey and Jerry Kraemer, for their unfailing love and support.

The Scripture quotations contained herein are from the New Revised Standard Version Bible, copyright © 1989 by the Division of Christian Education of the

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women's Religions in the Greco-Roman World: A Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents xi
  • Abbreviations xxv
  • Women's Religions in the Greco-Roman World *
  • Introduction 3
  • One - Observances, Rituals, and Festivals 9
  • Two - Researching Real Women: Documents To, From, and by Women 117
  • Three - Religious Office 241
  • Four - New Religious Affiliation and Conversion 279
  • Five - Holy, Pious, and Exemplary Women 329
  • Six - The Feminine Divine 415
  • Index of Female Names 479
  • Index of Ancient Sources 484
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 487

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.