Women's Religions in the Greco-Roman World: A Sourcebook

By Ross Shepard Kraemer | Go to book overview

FIVE
Holy, Pious, and Exemplary Women

The excerpts in this section offer a sampling of women whose piety (in the contemporary sense of religious devotion—in antiquity, by contrast, piety often had much to do with loyalty and duty) might be considered exemplary in some fashion. To whom, for whom, and by whom their piety is commended are not issues easily resolved. Nor is it apparent just who thought these qualities laudatory, beyond the writers of the texts and inscriptions assembled here. Like much of the material in this anthology, these excerpts particularly exemplify the difficulty of disentangling the rhetoric of gender from actual historical and social experience, if such a disentangling is ever in fact possible.

The three fourth-century inscriptions in entry 117 are a case in point. All the three commemorate married women, one an elite Roman matron, one probably an elite Jewish matron, and the third demonstrably Christian. While there are differences, all three appear to draw heavily on ancient notions about gender difference and about expectations for elite, respectable women in this period that make it difficult to draw too much in the way of conclusions about the realities of these women's lives.

Also assembled here are various narratives of early Christian women martyrs. Here, too, problems of history and rhetoric loom large.1 Accounts of the martyrdom of Blandina, and of the women among the Scillitan martyrs, are included in

____________________
1
There is an extensive, relatively recent bibliography on the problem of rhetoric and early Christian women's history: see, e.g., Averil Cameron, Christianity and the Rhetoric of Empire: The Development of Christian Discourse (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1991); Averil Cameron, “Virginity as Metaphor: Women and the Rhetoric of Early Christianity, ” in Averil Cameron, ed., History as Text: The Writing of Ancient History (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1990), 181–205; Elizabeth A. Clark, “Ideology, History, and the Construction of 'Woman' in Late Ancient Christianity, ” JECS no. 2 (1994): 155–84; Elizabeth A. Clark, “The Lady Vanishes: Dilemma of a Feminist Historian after the 'Linguistic Turn, ' ” Church History 63 no. 1 (1998) 1–31.

-329-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women's Religions in the Greco-Roman World: A Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents xi
  • Abbreviations xxv
  • Women's Religions in the Greco-Roman World *
  • Introduction 3
  • One - Observances, Rituals, and Festivals 9
  • Two - Researching Real Women: Documents To, From, and by Women 117
  • Three - Religious Office 241
  • Four - New Religious Affiliation and Conversion 279
  • Five - Holy, Pious, and Exemplary Women 329
  • Six - The Feminine Divine 415
  • Index of Female Names 479
  • Index of Ancient Sources 484
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 487

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.