EVIL AND CHRISTIAN ETHICS

Genocide in Rwanda, multiple murder at Denver or Dunblane, the gruesome activities of serial killers — what makes these great evils, and why do they occur? In addressing such questions this book, unusually, interconnects contemporary moral philosophy with recent work in New Testament scholarship. The conclusions to emerge are surprising. Gordon Graham argues that the inability of modernist thought to account satisfactorily for evil and its occurrence should not lead us to embrace an eclectic postmodernism, but to take seriously some unfashionable pre-modern conceptions ± Satan, demonic possession, spiritual powers, cosmic battles. Precisely because it strives to observe the high standards of clarity and rigour that are the hallmarks of philosophy in the analytical tradition, the book makes a powerful case for the rejection of humanism and naturalism, and for explaining the moral obligation to struggle against evil by reference to the New Testament's cosmic narrative.

GORDON GRAHAM is Regius Professor of Moral Philosophy at the University of Aberdeen. His books include Historical Explanation Reconsidered (1984), Politics and its Place: a Study of Six Ideologies (1986), Contemporary Social Philosophy (1987), The Idea of Christian Charity (1989), Living the Good Life: an Introduction to Moral Philosophy (1990), Ethics and International Relations (1997), The Shape of the Past: a Philosophical Approach to History (1997), Philosophy of the Arts (1997) and The Internet: a Philosophical Enquiry (1999). He has also published numerous journal and newspaper articles.

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Evil and Christian Ethics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • New Studies in Christian Ethics *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • General Editor's Preface xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgements xvii
  • Chapter 1 - Christian Ethics or Moral Theology? 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Real Jesus 29
  • Chapter 3 - Evil and Action 74
  • Chapter 4 - Forces of Light and Forces of Darkness 119
  • Chapter 5 - The Transformation of Evil 161
  • Chapter 6 - The Theology of Hope 205
  • Bibliography 230
  • Index 235
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