The French Second Empire: An Anatomy of Political Power

By Roger Price | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

I have accumulated an enormous number of debts since beginning work on this history. The raw material was largely provided by the archivists and librarians of the Archives nationales; Service historique de l'Armée de Terre; Bibliothèque nationale; University of East Anglia; University of Wales, Aberystwyth; and National Library of Wales. Research grants and study leave were generously awarded by both of the universities mentioned above and further indispensable funding by the British Academy, Leverhulme Trust, and Wolfson Foundation. I am grateful to William Doyle, Richard Evans, Douglas Johnson, Gwynne Lewis, and Vincent Wright for supporting various grant applications. Christopher Johnson, John Merriman, Sylvie Eyrich, Robert Frugère, and Jane Frugère offered encouragement and friendship. Colin Heywood was brave enough to take on the task of critically reading the original manuscript. Heather Price, more than anyone, improved its readability.

I am extremely grateful to William Davies and to the Syndics of Cambridge University Press for agreeing to publish the book as well as for the constructive criticism offered by the readers appointed by the Press, one of whom did me a great favour by suggesting the subtitle. Jean Field very efficiently copy-edited the text.

Above all I have to thank Richard and Luisa, Siân and Andy, Emily and Luke, Hannah, and my beloved Heather, who make life such a pleasure.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The French Second Empire: An Anatomy of Political Power
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 507

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.