The Word as Scalpel: A History of Medical Sociology

By Samuel W. Bloom | Go to book overview

6
First Steps toward
Social Identity

Effects of the War and
Its Aftermath on Medical Sociology

Introduction to Part II

The substantial intellectual and methodological foundations for a sociology of medicine that had accumulated by 1940 did not immediately spawn an identifiable special field. Even the name “medical sociology, ” in spite of its appearance at the end of the nineteenth century, 1 disappeared, and exactly when it surfaced again is obscure. Nevertheless, the subject matter began to be taught, in the thirties by Bernhard Stern at Columbia, in the early 1940s at the University of Chicago by Everett Hughes and by Leo Simmons at Yale. 2 Research on medical problems was part of the generally enhanced role of sociologists in the Second World War, and several of the field's outstanding pioneers trace their entry into medical sociology to wartime research. 3

Development in the postwar years began slowly until formal organization as a subspecialty began in 1955 with an ad hoc group called the Committee on Medical Sociology of the ASA. 4 Despite the prominent role of sociology in the war—in the Research Branch of the army's Information and Education Division under Samuel A. Stouffer, in the War Relocation Authority and the Foreign Morale Analysis Division under Alexander Leighton, in the Wartime Communications Research Project under Harold D. Lasswell, and in the Foreign Broadcast Monitoring Service run by Hadley Cantril—the first steps were very modest, even uncertain. When the war ended, almost all the social science research programs of the government were disbanded. 5 The researchers themselves returned to the universities, and included among them were those who would be the future pioneers of medical sociology.

Yet by 1965 medical sociology had become one of sociology's most active subspecialties, and it continues to be so today. The Medical Sociology Section of the ASA averages close to eleven hundred members, one of the largest numbers of

-111-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Word as Scalpel: A History of Medical Sociology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 348

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.