Slaves who Abolished Slavery: Blacks in Rebellion

By Richard Hart | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE

THE BLACK GENDARMES

Cudjoe's treaty is a document of such interest and significance that it repays publication of the entire text: JAMAICA SS:

At the Camp Trelawny-Town,
March 1st, 1738-39 1

In the name of GOD, Amen. Whereas captain Cudjoe, Captain Quaco, and several other negroes, their dependents, and adherents, have been in a state of war and hostility for several years past against our sovereign lord the king, and the inhabitants of this island;and whereas peace and friendship among mankind, and the preventing the effusion of blood, is agreeable to God, consonant to reason, and desired by every good man;and whereas his majesty George the second, king of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, and of Jamaica lord, Ec. has, by his letters patent, dated February 24th, 1738 1 in the twelfth year of his reign, granted full power and authority to John Guthrie and Francis Saddler, esquires, to negotiate and finally conclude a treaty of peace and friendship with the aforesaid captain Cudjoe, the rest of his captains, adherents and others his men; they mutually, sincerely, and amicably, have agreed to the following articles.
1st. That all hostilities shall cease on both sides for ever.
2d. That the said captain Cudjoe, the rest of his captains, adherents and men shall be for ever hereafter in a perfect state of freedom and liberty, excepting those who have been taken by them, or fled to them, within two years last past, if such are willing to return to their said masters and owners, with full pardon and indemnity from their said masters and owners, for what is past; provided always, that if they are not willing to return, they shall remain in subjection to captain Cudjoe, and in friendship with us, according to the form and tenor of this treaty.
3rd. That they shall enjoy and possess, for themselves and posterity for

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