Slaves who Abolished Slavery: Blacks in Rebellion

By Richard Hart | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIFTEEN

THE REBELS RE-SET THE TIME TABLE

Whilst they still had the initiative in the early stages of the rebellion the rebel slaves, despite the deep resentment that they must have felt towards those who had for so long profited from their degradation, had been surprisingly merciful to those whites who fell into their hands. With few exceptions the lives of proprietors, attorneys and overseers, taken by surprise, had been spared and their families had been allowed to go free. Instances of ill-treatment of prisoners, though not unknown, had been rare.

This was as Sam Sharpe had wished it to be. As he explained to the captive overseer at Ginger Hill, he wanted to avoid unnecessary destruction of life, not wishing anyone to be harmed who did not oppose the rebels by force. This explains why only 14 whites and three of their brown allies were killed and only 12 whites and two browns were wounded. 1 In St. Elizabeth the three whites killed and wounded were soldiers. The returns from the other parishes do not specify whether the killed and wounded were soldiers or civilians. No blacks, not even the ubiquitous "Uncle Toms", were harmed [PRO:CO 137/185].

The whites behaved very differently towards the blacks. The number of rebels killed during the fighting may not have been excessive, having regard to the scope of the rebellion

-325-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Slaves who Abolished Slavery: Blacks in Rebellion
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 358

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.