The Cambridge Companion to Newton

By I. Bernard Cohen; George E. Smith | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

The first part of this bibliography lists Newton's writings in three groups: those published in his lifetime, works published posthumously during the first decades after he died, and edited collections of his papers. Although the works Newton published in his lifetime were monumental in their impact, after the initial flurry provoked by his first two papers on optics, they were few in number both by our standards and by those of his time, comprising a small fraction of his surviving writings. Extensive publication of his remaining papers and manuscripts began only in the 1950s and is still continuing. Through the extraordinary effort of D. T. Whiteside, Newton's mathematical papers, including work in mathematical physics, have been gathered into eight volumes, stretching from his undergraduate years in Cambridge until his final decade. One volume of his optical writings is now in print, and the second volume will soon appear. Efforts continue on compiling and publishing his writings in chemistry and alchemy, almost none of which has ever been put into print; these include detailed recordings of a vast array of experiments Newton personally conducted. Efforts are also under way on his theological manuscripts, the majority of which became available only after they were deposited as the Yahuda Papers in the Jewish National and University Library in Jerusalem. Beyond these efforts, with Cambridge University's purchase now completed, the Earl of Macclesfield Collection of Newton's papers should soon be open to general scholarly examination for the first time. The next few decades will therefore be adding significantly to the list of Newton's printed works.

The second part of the bibliography provides a selection of notable writings on Newton, separated into groups corresponding to the major areas of his intellectual endeavors. Our selection is limited to works in English, omitting many outstanding studies in French and German. It also concentrates on comparatively recent works. One reason for this is the thorough listing in Newton and Newtoniana 1672–1675: A Bibliography published by Peter Wallis and Ruth Wallis in 1977, to which readers can turn to survey earlier

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The Cambridge Companion to Newton
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Contributors ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes *
  • 1 - Newton's Philosophical Analysis of Space and Time 33
  • Notes *
  • 2 - Newton's Concepts of Force and Mass, with Notes on the Laws of Motion 57
  • Notes *
  • 3 - Curvature in Newton's Dynamics 85
  • Notes *
  • 4 - The Methodology of the Principia 138
  • Notes *
  • 5 - Newton's Argument for Universal Gravitation 174
  • Notes *
  • 6 - Newton and Celestial Mechanics 202
  • Notes *
  • 7 - Newton's Optics and Atomism 227
  • Notes *
  • 8 - Newton's Metaphysics 256
  • Notes *
  • 9 - Analysis and Synthesis in Newton's Mathematical Work 308
  • Notes *
  • 10 - Newton, Active Powers, and the Mechanical Philosophy 329
  • Notes *
  • 11 - The Background to Newton's Chymistry 358
  • Notes *
  • 12 - Newton's Alchemy 370
  • Notes *
  • 13 - Newton on Prophecy and the Apocalypse 387
  • Notes *
  • 14 - Newton and Eighteenth-Century Christianity 409
  • Notes *
  • 15 - Newton Versus Leibniz: from Geometry to Metaphysics 431
  • Notes *
  • 16 - Newton and the Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence 455
  • Notes *
  • Bibliography 465
  • Index 481
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