Modernism and Cultural Conflict, 1880-1922

By Ann L. Ardis | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
“Life is not composed of watertight compartments”: the
New Age's critique of modernist literary specialization

BLAST GRAMMAR, BLESS CLICHE,

BLAST SPELLING, BLESS BIG PRINT,

BLAST REASON, BLESS BLOOD,

BLAST SENSE, SO BLESS SELF, SO

BLAST THE NEW AGE. BLESS WYNDY LEWIS.

C. H. Bechhofer, “More Contemporaries, ” New Age, July 30, 1914 1

Twinkle, twinkle, Ezra Pound, Like a candle underground. Cubes, potatoes, prunes and prisms Summarise your witticisms … Twinkle, twinkle, my NEW AGE; Star shells burst on every page, By whose light you boldly tilt At the mills of England's guilt.

L'Hibou, New Age, July 15, 1915 2

The advertising flyer for Brown University's “Modernist Journals Project” introduces this exciting, and massive, new digital research initiative by noting its commitment to “providing on-line editions of Englishlanguage journals that were important in shaping those modes of literature and art that came to be called modernist. ” “At the MJP site, ” the flyer continues, readers will find keyword-searchable texts of modernist journals, as well as essays on general topics related to modernism, and discussions of particular publications and their historical and cultural background. Our first project is an edition of The New Age: A Weekly Review of Politics, Literature and Art, edited in London by A. R. Orage from 1907 to 1922. The New Age offered its readers an in-depth view of the political, social, and cultural landscape of England at the time. During the 15 years when A. R. Orage presided over the paper, it published many of England's best writers and became one of the chief organs for cultivating public opinion about modern art and literature.

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