The Ninth State: New Hampshire's Formative Years

By Lynn Warren Turner | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II

THE OLD ORDER
YIELDETH

That manufactures, to a certain extent, will be useful to our country & profitable to the owners cannot be doubted, but I am inclined to think at this time we are pressing too fast into them, both for the interest of the country & that of the proprietors. —William Plumer

New Hampshire grew in population during the years between the first census and the fourth but not quite as rapidly as the nation. 1 In 1790 the northernmost state had comprised 3.6 percent of the total population and was tenth in size among the thirteen states; but by 1820 it contained only 2.5 percent of the people and had dropped to fifteenth place among the twenty-seven states and territories. 2 Yet New Hampshire had grown by 72 percent in these thirty years. The distribution and significance of this increase may be seen in Table II-I. 3

Every section of the state participated in this advance, although the more recently settled areas of course made the greater proportional gains. During these decades, New Hampshire was still in the "summer" of its development, beckoning the surplus population of southern New England to cheap farms and economic independence. 4 The competition of western soil had as yet diverted only a part of that copious stream of Yankee emigration from the empty land on its own borders. Edward St. Loe Livermore, who visited the Ohio country in 1816 to inspect some of his land purchases, wrote in great disillusionment that "while the people in Mass. and N. H. can so easily obtain lands at home where they are both acquainted with soil climate and productions they are great fools if they emigrate to any of these places." 5 New Hampshire farms still played a part in the dreams of European immigrants. An English cobbler who had settled on a farm in Merrimack wrote in 1821 to a friend still in England, painting the country in glowing colors and stressing the independence that he enjoyed. "I assure you I have made every possible enquiry," he concluded, "and can safely invite you to this happy country." 6

The constant increase in population and particularly the filling in of the frontier spaces is vividly shown by a comparison of population maps of 1775 and 1820. (See Maps 2 and 21). 7 While Portsmouth was the only

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The Ninth State: New Hampshire's Formative Years
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Ninth State - New Hampshire's Formative Years *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword *
  • Preface *
  • Chapter 1 - Revolutionary New Hampshire *
  • Chapter 2 - Constitution Making *
  • Chapter 3 - Peace and Depression *
  • Chapter 4 - Personal Politics *
  • Chapter 5 - A Fragment of Social History *
  • Chapter 6 - In the Federal Union *
  • Chapter 7 - Constitutional Revision *
  • Chapter 8 - The Rise of Parties *
  • Chapter 9 - Federalists and Republicans *
  • Chapter 10 - Federalist Decline *
  • Chapter 11 - The Old Order Yieldeth *
  • Chapter 12 - Democracy Triumphant *
  • Chapter 13 - Federalist Collapse *
  • Chapter 14 - Blockade and Embargo *
  • Chapter 15 - Drifting Toward War *
  • Chapter 16 - In the War with England *
  • Chapter 17 - The Indian Summer of Federalism *
  • Chapter 18 - Peace Abroad: War at Home *
  • Chapter 19 - Tribulations *
  • Chapter 20 - The Demise of Federalism *
  • Chapter 21 - Reform and Freedom *
  • Appendix - Maps and Explanations *
  • Notes *
  • Index *
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