The Ninth State: New Hampshire's Formative Years

By Lynn Warren Turner | Go to book overview

NOTES

CHAPTER I
I.
The epigraph is drawn from Belknap's The History of New Hampshire, 3 vols., 2d ed. (Boston, 1813), 3:191. William Plumer, "Autobiography," William Plumer Papers, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C., pp. 15-16.
2.
Richard Francis Upton, Revolutionary New Hampshire (Hanover, N. H., 1936), p. 2II.
3.
Nathaniel Adams, Annals of Portsmouth (Portsmouth, N. H., 1825), pp. 276-78.
4.
Matthew Patten, The Diary of Matthew Patten of Bedford, N. H., 1754-1788 (Con- cord, N. H., 1903), p. 467.
5.
Upton, Revolutionary New Hampshire, p. 105.
6.
Belknap, New Hampshire, 3:177. The figure for 1767 is that of an actual census taken by the towns upon order of the royal governor. The figure for 1780 is Belknap's estimate.
7.
Ibid., p. 191.
8.
Timothy Dwight, Travels in New England and New York, 4 vols., 2d ed. (London, I823), 4:162. This statement was written in 1813. It is a curious fact that New Hampshire's sectional divisions in early times, so obvious to contemporary observers, were not apparent to such later historians as George Barstow, J. N. McClintock, E. D. Sanborn, and Nathan Batchellor. Other lines of division, such as those between political parties and between proslavery and antislavery sentiment, were more obvious in their day.
9.
Documents and Records Relating to the Province [Towns and State] of New Hamp- shire (1623-1800), 39 vols., hereafter cited as New Hampshire State Papers. Volumes I-10 were edited by Nathaniel Bouton, volumes II-18 by I. W. Hammond, and volumes 19-31 by A. S. Batchellor. Most were published at Concord, although volume 7 was published at Nashua and volumes 20-22 at Manchester. Volumes used in this study are: I,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,18,20,21,22,27,29. The population statistics in this regional survey are computed from the census of 1790, volume 13 (Concord, N. H., 1884), pp. 767-74.
10.
The statement of relative wealth is based on tax assessments in 1768. This may not have been an accurate criterion twelve years later, but it is assumed that relative positions would not have diminished between the Old Colony and other regions. Although a great deal of ratable estate was created outside the Old Colony during these years, it is also true that the intangible wealth of the investors in Portsmouth, which was not subject to taxation, would have increased in proportion. See the seventh volume of the New Hampshire State Papers (Nashua, N. H., 1873), 7:166-67, for the tax lists of 1768.
II.
John Adams, Diary and Autobiography of John Adams, ed. Lyman H. Butterfield, 4 vols. (Cambridge, Mass., 1961), I:355. Jere B. Daniell, Experiment in Republicanism: New Hampshire Politics and the American Revolution, 1741-1794 (Cambridge, Mass., 1970), though somewhat burdened with a debatable thesis, is an interesting analysis of the trans- formation from royal colony to republican state government.
12.
Nathaniel Bouton, History of Concord (Concord, N. H., 1856), chap. 7.
13.
Edward Parker, History of Londonderry (Boston, 1851), pp. 97-99.
14.
New Hampshire State Papers (1873), 7:370-71.
15.
Ibid., pp. 665-69. See also Daniell, Experiment in Republicanism, p. 107. In the

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The Ninth State: New Hampshire's Formative Years
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Ninth State - New Hampshire's Formative Years *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword *
  • Preface *
  • Chapter 1 - Revolutionary New Hampshire *
  • Chapter 2 - Constitution Making *
  • Chapter 3 - Peace and Depression *
  • Chapter 4 - Personal Politics *
  • Chapter 5 - A Fragment of Social History *
  • Chapter 6 - In the Federal Union *
  • Chapter 7 - Constitutional Revision *
  • Chapter 8 - The Rise of Parties *
  • Chapter 9 - Federalists and Republicans *
  • Chapter 10 - Federalist Decline *
  • Chapter 11 - The Old Order Yieldeth *
  • Chapter 12 - Democracy Triumphant *
  • Chapter 13 - Federalist Collapse *
  • Chapter 14 - Blockade and Embargo *
  • Chapter 15 - Drifting Toward War *
  • Chapter 16 - In the War with England *
  • Chapter 17 - The Indian Summer of Federalism *
  • Chapter 18 - Peace Abroad: War at Home *
  • Chapter 19 - Tribulations *
  • Chapter 20 - The Demise of Federalism *
  • Chapter 21 - Reform and Freedom *
  • Appendix - Maps and Explanations *
  • Notes *
  • Index *
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