The Life of Langston Hughes - Vol. 2

By Arnold Rampersad | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

IN THE SUMMER of 1979, at the request of Professor George Houston Bass of Brown University, the surviving executor-trustee of the Langston Hughes estate, I began the task of writing a biography of Hughes. With the appearance of my second volume, the job is done. I am indebted to Professor Bass for his kindness and encouragement at every point, as well as for sharing with me his knowledge of Langston Hughes. Above all, I thank him for allowing me to express, without hindrance, my own version and vision of Hughes's life.

Among institutions, I am grateful to the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, and the American Council of Learned Societies, as well as to Stanford University and Rutgers University. At Stanford, I thank in particular Bliss Carnochan, William Chace, Diane Middlebrook, Albert Gelpi, Robert Polhemus, and Jay Fliegelman. At Rutgers, I have been indebted to many people, including George Levine, Richard Poirier, Thomas Van Laan, Donald Gibson, and Cheryl Wall of the Department of English, as well as to Tilden Edelstein and Kenneth Wheeler.

Among librarians, I would like to acknowledge my debt above all to the administrators and staff of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University, where the Langston Hughes Papers, donated by Hughes himself, may be found in the James Weldon Johnson Memorial Collection of Negro Arts and Letters founded by Carl Van Vechten. I am grateful to Donald Gallup and David Schoonover, former curators of the Collection in American Literature, as well as to Patricia Cannon Willis, the present curator. I also thank Lisa Browar, Joan Hofmann, Steve Jones, and many others on the staff, past and present, for their unfailing skill and courtesy. All researchers in the Langston Hughes Papers are particularly indebted to George P. Cunningham who, with Patricia Gaskins and Martha Schall, organized the Langston Hughes correspondence at the Beinecke.

I also thank members of the staff at the Amistad Research Center (New Orleans); the Archives Department of the Atlanta University Center Woodruff Library; Special Collections at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville; the Bancroft Library of the University of California; the Bibliothèque Nationale; the Harrison Memorial Library of Carmel, California; the Library of Congress; the Columbiana Collection and the Butler Library at Columbia University; the archives of the Federal Bureau of Investigation; the Fisk University Library;

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The Life of Langston Hughes - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Life of Langston Hughes - I Dream a World *
  • Contents *
  • 1 - Still Here 1941 3
  • 2 - Jim Crow''s Last Stand 1941 To 1943 32
  • 3 - Simple Speaks His Mind 1943 To 1944 61
  • 4 - Third Degree 1944 To 1945 88
  • 5 - Street Scene 1945 To 1947 108
  • 6 - Heart on the Wall 1947 To 1948 128
  • 7 - On Solid Ground 1948 To 1950 146
  • 8 - In Warm Manure 1951 To 1953 189
  • 9 - Out from under 1953 To 1956 223
  • 10 - Making Hay 1957 To 1958 263
  • 11 - You Are the World 1958 To 1960 288
  • 12 - Ask Your Mama! 1960 To 1961 314
  • 13 - In Gospel Glory 1961 To 1963 341
  • 14 - Blues for Mister Backlash 1963 To 1965 364
  • 15 - Final Call 1965 To 1966 386
  • 16 - Do Nothing till You Hear from Me 1966 To 1967 404
  • Afterword 426
  • Abbreviations 436
  • Notes 437
  • Acknowledgments 493
  • Index 499
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