Doing Literary Business: American Women Writers in the Nineteenth Century

By Susan Coultrap-McQuin | Go to book overview

Preface

This study focuses on the literary careers of five women writers of the nineteenth century: E. D. E. N. Southworth, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Mary Abigail Dodge who used the pseudonym "Gail Hamilton," Helen Hunt Jackson who used the pseudonyms "H. H." and "Saxe Holm," and Elizabeth Stuart Phelps (Ward). Although I had first planned to write a composite history of women's literary professionalism in the nineteenth century based on studies of the careers of twenty writers, I eventually decided that a composite approach obscured important differences between the women by emphasizing somewhat misleading similarities. Therefore, I turned my attention to the five writers named above. I chose these particular writers because I had developed an enormous respect for them as individuals facing particular problems in their careers and because, though individuals, they also show what I believe are some typical experiences and responses of women in the literary marketplace.

My choice of individuals will, perhaps, be faulted for one reason or another: I have left out some important writers; I have not looked at those women who failed; I have not adequately represented women's cultural diversity. I would claim, however, that my five writers provide a good cross section from the very popular to the moderately successful, from the well-to-do to the occasionally impoverished; their social class and race are typical of writers of their time, although their approaches to and experiences in the world were quite varied. They also represent women's participation in a variety of literary fields—fiction, poetry, and nonfiction ; they used literary approaches from the sensational to the serious. In addition, the overlapping years of these writers' careers provide a useful time line for women's participation in the literary marketplace from the I840s to the early I900s. Although I do not claim they represent every woman's experiences in that marketplace, I do believe these five women

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Doing Literary Business: American Women Writers in the Nineteenth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 253

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.