Doing Literary Business: American Women Writers in the Nineteenth Century

By Susan Coultrap-McQuin | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I incurred many debts while working on this book. Without the help of librarians across the country, I could not have located the thousands of pages of author-publisher correspondence that are the foundation of my work. I am particularly grateful to the universities and libraries that granted me permission to quote from manuscript sources in their collections and to use pictures from their archives. They include the American Antiquarian Society, Boston Public Library, Bowdoin College, Brigham Young University, Colorado College, Columbia University, Cornell University, Duke University, Essex Institute, Haverford College, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Harvard University, Huntington Library, Jones Library, Louisiana State University, Macmillan Publishing Company, Massachusetts Historical Society, Minnesota Historical Society, New York Public Library, Pennsylvania State University, Princeton University, Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center, Radcliffe College, Smith College, Stanford University Libraries, Stowe-Day Foundation, Trinity College, Vassar College, University of Virginia, and Yale University. In addition, I deeply appreciate the cooperation and efficiency of Susan Kesti and Mary Palzer, librarians at the University of Minnesota-Duluth (UMD) who expedited my many minitex and interlibrary loan requests.

I am also sincerely grateful for the grants I received from the University of Minnesota Graduate School, the College of Letters and Sciences‐ UMD, and the College of Liberal Arts-UMD that helped me to defray expenses during the research and writing process. In addition, I wish to thank Randi Freesol and Karla Ward especially, as well as Jean Nygaard and Barb Williams, who each had a hand in typing the manuscript. My research assistants over the years—Randi Freesol, Belinda Loosen, Holly Nordquist, and Debra Ogston—never lost patience or care with the endless bibliographies and library searches. And Stevie Champion, my copy

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