The Wycliffite Heresy: Authority and the Interpretation of Texts

By Kantik Ghosh | Go to book overview

CAMBRIDGE STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE

General editor
Alastair Minnis, University of York

Editorial board
Patrick Boyde, University of Cambridge
John Burrow, University of Bristol
Rita Copeland, University of Pennsylvania
Alan Deyermond, University of London
Peter Dronke, University of Cambridge
Simon Gaunt, King's College, London
Nigel Palmer, University of Oxford
Winthrop Wetherbee, Cornell University

This series of critical books seeks to cover the whole area of literature written in
the major medieval languages — the main European vernaculars, and medieval
Latin and Greek — during the period c. 1100–1500. Its chief aim is to publish and
stimulate fresh scholarship and criticism on medieval literature, special emphasis
being placed on understanding major works of poetry, prose, and drama in relation
to the contemporary culture and learning which fostered them.

Recent titles in the series

Christopher Cannon The Making of Chaucer's English: A Study of Words

Rosalind Brown-Grant Christine de Pizan and the Moral Defence of Women: Reading Beyond Gender

Richard Newhauser The Early History of Greed: The Sin of Avarice in Early
Medieval Thought and Literature

Margaret Clunies Ross Old Icelandic Literature and Society
Donald Maddox Fictions of Identity in Medieval France
Rita Copeland Pedagogy, Intellectuals and Dissent in the Later Middle Ages:
Lollardy and Ideas of Learning

A complete list of titles in the series can be found at the end of the volume.

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