Index
Adderley, Cannonball, 246
Adderley, Nat, 253
Alexander, Willard, 171
American culture
democratization of, 269–70
impact of jazz on, 8–9, 270–4
American Federation of Musicians (AFM), 28, 29, 101–2, 120–1, 221
American music
cultivated vernacular as, 62–75
of early twentieth century, 44–5
high and popular are in, 5–8
politics of swing as, 124–6
rejection of jazz as, 83–4
American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP), 31, 101
American Syncopated Orchestra, 76
Amons, Albert, 190
Ansermet, Ernest, 76–7
Antrim, Doron K., 69, 99, 115
Armstrong, Lil, 192
Armstrong, Louis, 58, 96, 112, 113, 115, 117, 118, 119, 137, 139, 147, 159, 181, 193, 222, 231, 270
Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM), 258
Audiences, 4
education of, 14–16, 17–18, 38, 68, 102, 103
see also jazz connoisseurs; jazz enthusiasts
Avakian, George, 169, 184, 199, 229, 236
Ayler, Albert, 257
bands, 15, 27–8
see also big bands; orchestras
Basie, Count, 112, 120, 126, 149–50, 155, 231
bebop, 134, 154, 204–14, 222–4
Becker, Howard, 2, 4, 211, 249, 264, 265
Beiderbecke, Bix, 118, 136, 139, 140, 142–3, 159
Berg, Billy, 167
big bands
decline of, 216, 219–21
progressive, 211–12
see also sweet music; swing music
Black Artists Group (BAG), 258
Black Arts Movement, 256
black entertainment, 1920s boom in, 51
black music and modern jazz, 251–60
black musicians
and cultivated music, 39–44
and cultivated vernacular, 57–9, 60–2
difficulties during war, 132–4
and 'good' music, 22–7
and high art, 75–81
impact of Depression on, 100
improvisation and jamming by, 149–51
media coverage of, 112, 113, 114, 115–17, 118–19, 253
of modern jazz renaissance, 245–7, 248
portrayals of, 190, 192–3
radical politics of beboppers, 207
swing music and status of, 96, 111–22, 145–6
work with white musicians, 121–2, 128–31
see also racial division and segregation
Black Nationalism, 251, 256, 258
Black Studies, 259
black unions, 29–30, 120
black vernacular music
adopted by white hepcats, 135, 136, 139
and genuine jazz, 186–198
and 'good' music, 22–7
as high art, 75–81
and popular music of Jazz Age, 49–52
and swing, 155
Black, Frank, 103
Blakey, Art, 229, 233, 246, 252
Blesh, Rudi, 166
Bolden, Buddy, 3, 190
boogie woogie, 192
booking agencies, 101, 113

-287-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Rise of a Jazz Art World
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 294

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.