Controlling Voices: Intellectual Property, Humanistic Studies, and the Internet

By Tyanna K. Herrington | Go to book overview

5
Controlling Construction: The Internet,
Law, and Humanistic Studies

Society's cultural influences help to create us as a people and a nation; no individual or community develops in isolation. Communities' values, beliefs, and goals shape the development of organizational structures, and their ideologies drive community actions. Despite the fact that law is a system of rules, that humanistic studies are academic disciplines, and that the Internet is a technological system, each is also an organization of people who are influenced by the values, beliefs, and goals of other members of their organization. In other words, regardless of the fact that each individual has a separate and distinct identity, may maintain viewpoints that conflict with those of others in the community, and may also be a member of other communities, each community is made up of individuals who are drawn together in a framework of culture. It is important to understand the cultural drives behind each of these communities, particularly as they influence ideology, in order to examine how issues in intellectual property both affect and are affected by community forces. In fact, when intellectual property law is interpreted from an ideology that supports protection of individual economic interest over that of the public in information and knowledge creation, it can hamper a community's ability to determine its own culture as well as its future. Individuals from communities driven by ideologies contrary to those that would support a protectionist stance should understand the cultural effect of ideology in order to participate in influencing it in a way that represents their alternate voices. The law has power to affect culture and community:

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Controlling Voices: Intellectual Property, Humanistic Studies, and the Internet
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Controlling Voices *
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - The Law 25
  • 1 - Protective Control for Intellectual Products 27
  • 2 - Copyrights and Duties 35
  • 3 - Fair Use, Access, and Cultural Construction 59
  • 4 - Law and Policy: the Balance in Cyberspace 77
  • Part Two - Ideology and Power 85
  • 5 - Controlling Construction: the Internet, Law, and Humanistic Studies 87
  • 6 - Controlling Ideologies: the Internet, Law, and Humanistic Studies 112
  • 7 - The New Millennium and Controlling Voices 129
  • Notes 157
  • Works Cited 159
  • Index 167
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