China in the World Market: Chinese Industry and International Sources of Reform in the Post-Mao Era

By Thomas G. Moore | Go to book overview

5
China Looms Large:
Reform and Rationalization
in the Textile Industry

THE previous chapter documented China's successful response to the MFA, a response marked by export upgrading, adjustments to the product mix, and market diversification among export destinations. This chapter will explore how that record of industrial restructuring was built, with special emphasis on the policy environment. It begins by reviewing the problems that China's textile industry faced as it sought to cope with quotas. It then discusses the various administrative measures and economic reforms that were taken in an effort to improve the industry's performance. Here, the main argument is that bureaucratic coordination gave way over time to market coordination as the primary means for pursuing economic adjustment in the textile industry, albeit only after administrative measures failed to produce the desired changes. Next, the chapter provides an overview of rationalization efforts within the industry. Lastly, it examines the system of quota allocation as a detailed case study of China's adjustment to life under the MFA.


HANGING BY A THREAD: CHINA COPES WITH THE MFA

Although legendary for their immensity, the problems affecting the textile industry are little different from the basic challenges that all Chinese industries have faced during the post-Mao era. Indeed, the textile industry has at one time or another suffered from just about every affliction one could mention: stockpiled output; idle equipment/surplus capacity; unplanned development; outmoded technology; deteriorating physical plant; a crushing tax burden; redundant workers; poor management; an unreasonable price structure; the heavy burden of providing wages and other support for huge numbers of retired employees; wasted investment funds; lack of financial profitability; and persistent shortages

-111-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
China in the World Market: Chinese Industry and International Sources of Reform in the Post-Mao Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 343

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.