Democratic Distributive Justice

By Ross Zucker | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The greatest intellectual debts are sometimes personal ones. Charles E. Lindblom aided my education in many crucial ways, such as giving needed support for this research, providing rigorous and eloquent critiques of several drafts, and removing or helping me to overcome various obstacles. I am extremely grateful to have had the opportunity to study political economy with this man, whose sophisticated knowledge taught me much, and whose exemplary human qualities taught me even more. My father, Herbert Zucker, enhanced the possiblity that this book would come into being by responding to numerous trial balloons during the formative stages of the work and preparing a commentary on a draft of the whole manuscript. The interest and involvement he took were sustaining, and it is to him that this book is is dedicated.

One day many years ago, while attending a class on classical political economy taught by David P. Levine at Yale, some of the basic ideas of this book occurred to me quite suddenly, though it has taken much time to work them out. Moreover, Levine's writings contain insights into the social nature of the individual that I have found useful in developing a social theory of economic rights and of democracy.

When the manuscript was nearing its final stages, Robert Dahl examined it, gave me his well-considered judgment, and formulated a strategy of revision that was helpful in making final improvements. Carol C. Gould and Sidney Morgenbesser pressed me to elaborate the relationship between equality and community that I had sketched at a seminar, and on other occasions Gould made a variety of helpful suggestions and provided important forms of support for this project. Gary Mongiovi, coeditor of the Review of Political Economy, shared his considerable knowledge of economics with me in a detailed commentary on the manuscript. Claire Cook provided the benefit of her general editorial

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Democratic Distributive Justice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 336

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.