The Cold War and Its Origins, 1917-1960 - Vol. 1

By D. F. Fleming | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVI
THE TRUMAN DOCTRINE JANUARY-JUNE 1947

THE stabilization which took place in December 1946, with final agreement on the satellite treaties, was accompanied by a real relaxation of tension on Russia's side. The Soviets felt assured that their influence would be predominant in Eastern Europe. Their primary war aim had been achieved.

Signs of Relaxation. In Poland the Russians effaced themselves as much as possible. A correspondent who toured Poland for several weeks found them only 40,000 in number, seldom seen, quiet and well behaved. They were courteous to the Polish troops and sought to treat Poland as a sovereign state.1 American doctors attending a medical meeting in Czechoslovakia "constantly looked for that iron curtain or evidence of Russian intervention or influence, but never found it." They moved "as freely as in the United States." United Nations news broadcasts from Lake Success, in Russian, were also accepted in the Soviet Union and relayed over domestic wave lengths. The broadcasts "complete from controversies to personalities" were approved by Soviet officials as impartial, indicating the the Soviets felt at peace with the world enough to welcome a fairly important contact with it.2

Their sphere of influence having been recognized, the Russians moved to recognize our exclusive-custody, strategic-area trusteeship of the former Japanese mandated islands in the Pacific. A Russian note received in Washington on February 24, 1947, held this arrangement to be "entirely fair."

Russian production was also putting heavy emphasis on consumer goods.3

____________________
1
Marguerite Higgins, New York Herald Tribune, February 8, 1947. Another American woman who had been strongly warned about the Russian troops in the Soviet zone of Austria travelled through it freely and without the slightest incident. -- Emma Ewing, the Nashville Tennessean, January 24, 1947.
2
Dr. J. E. M. Thomson of Lincoln, Nebraska, the New York Times, January 26, 1947; February 26, 1947. On February 22, sixteen eminent churchmen, members of the Inter- Church Committee of the American Russian Institute issued a statement warning that suspicion, fear and hate could precipitate an atomic holocaust. -- Herald Tribune, February 23, 1947.
3
Herald Tribune, February 23, 26, 1947. On March 4, Richard Lauterbach, former head of the Time-Life bureau in Moscow, said of the Russians: "I don't care how strict their dictatorship is, they just couldn't make these people go to war unless they are invaded, and that's their one fear." -- The New York Times, March 5, 1947.

On January 23, Dr. J. B. S. Haldane, "British geneticist, author and socialist," told a communist rally in Madison Square Garden that given thirty years of peace the Soviet Union would give a higher standard of living to its people than any nation under capitalist economy. -- Herald Tribune, January 24, 1947.

-433-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Cold War and Its Origins, 1917-1960 - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 542

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.