Narrative, Religion, and Science: Fundamentalism versus Irony, 1700-1999

By Stephen Prickett | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book was largely written during a year's leave as a visiting scholar in the English Department of the Australian National University in Canberra, and later, for a shorter period, in the National University of Singapore. To Livio Dobrez and David Parker, successively Heads of Department at the ANU, I owe thanks not merely for sympathetic encouragement, but also for practical suggestions and many lent books. Similarly, in Singapore, Robbie Goh and Ban Kah Choon made me more than welcome, providing the time and conditions to complete my research.

A number of Glasgow colleagues have given generously of their own time to read parts or all of this work as it developed, and their comments have been invaluable. In particular I owe an enormous debt to Richard Cronin, Bob Grant and Donald Mackenzie. At a greater distance, to Kevin Hart, I owe no less profound thanks, as I do also to Patsy Erskine-Hill, whose close critical reading has saved me from many unseen ambiguities and even more infelicities. Special thanks must also go to Simon Haines who went beyond all canons of hospitality, lending me not only his own unfinished manuscripts, but also his extensive library, together with the room that held it.

Others, in Canberra, Glasgow and Singapore, such as Susan Ang, Robert Barnes, Terence Dawson, Clifford Siskin, Rajeev Patke and Rex Whitehead, will probably be unaware of the ideas I gleaned from casual remarks or conversations, but they too have played an important part in the genesis of this work. Finally, I have to thank Jeanette Sky for running to earth in the Royal Library of Copenhagen the anonymous print of The Tomb of Napoleon which had so inspired Kierkegaard, but which seems to have eluded many of his subsequent commentators. I acknowledge that Library's kindness in granting permission to reproduce it as cover and frontispiece to this book.

-vii-

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