The Rise of Professionalism: A Sociological Analysis

By Magali Sarfatti Larson | Go to book overview

Index
Accountancy, 193, 204
Accountants: clients of, 214; study of in bureaucratic work setting, 191
Achievement: and democratic liberalism, 80; educational, 239-40
Adams, Charles K., 151
Administrative professionals, 187
Aerospace professionals, 192
Agricultural employment, decline of, 146
Althusser, Louis, 239, 241
American Association of Social Workers, 181
American Bar Associations, 167; establishment of, 170; standards of admission set by, 173-175
American College of Surgeons, 37, 165
American Medical Association, 73; as advocate of unrealistic standards for medical school entrants, 131-132; code of ethics of, 160; Council on Medical Education, 162, 163, 164-165; establishment of, 20, 130; as leader in medical reform, 161-162
American Railroad Journal, 75
American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 28
Ames, James B., 171, 172
Anti-market principles, 56-63; role of in ideology of profession, 220.
Apothecaries: in medical hierarchy of nineteenth- century England, 87-88; as medical practitioners, 11; training and prestige of, 19
Apothecaries Act, 87-88
Apprenticeship: in colonial United States, 105, 106; for engineering, 27; vs. formal training, 16, 20; as source of professional education, 94 Architecture, 3, 109, 216
Aristocracy, in colonial United States, 107, 109, 111, 113, 115
Aristocratic elite: vs. middle-class practitioners, 12; sources of prestige for, 68-69. See also Elite, professional Aristocratic model, uses and limitations of, 80-103
Ascription, 80, 81
Ashby, Sir Eric, 100
Association of American Law Schools, 173, 174- 175
Association of American Medical Colleges, 161
Association of Professional Schools and Social Work, 181
Associations, professional, 208; and collective Associations, professional (continued) credit of the profession, 69-72; controlled by the elite, 71-72; vs. the craft union, 55-56; in creating the monopolistic professional market, 15; development of national, 154; emergence of, 180; of engineers, 28-29, 123; history of, 5, 208; legal, 167; medical, 21, 23, 73, 130-132, 161-162; of national scope, 246; for practitioners of law in nineteenth-century England, 85-86. See also Societies, professional
Attorneys: in colonial United States, 111; control of unworthy, 11; in nineteenth-century England, 85-86. See also Lawyers; Legal profession
Auerbach, Jerold, 172
Autonomy, professional, xii, 56; basis of, 38; in conflict between professions and bureaucracy, 190-193; in the engineering profession, 29-30; as a goal of professionalizing occupations, 219; proletarian occupations compared to, 157
Bachrach, Peter, 243
Bacteriology. See Medicine, rise of bacteriology in
Bar, admission standards to, 124
Bar associations, 167, 170-171
Baylin, Bernard, 106
Beach, Wooster, 129
Bemis, Edward, 151
Ben-David, Joseph, 33
Bendix, Reinhard, 141, 197
Benthamites, influence of, 81, 91, 94, 96
Berg, Ivar, 240
Bernard, Claude, 36, 43
Biddle, N., 114
Blackstone, Sir William, 86
Blauner, Robert, 234, 235, 237
Bolshevism, 146
Boston, Mass., 108, 125
Boulding, Kenneth, 76-77, 104
Bourgeois ideology, integrated with the ideology of profession, 219, 221-225
Brandeis, Louis, 141, 172, 173
British Medical Association, 95
Bureaucracy and profession, 178-207; "autonomous professional organizations" vs. "heteronomous organizations," 185, 196; career alternatives for professionals, 193-194, 204- 205; career patterns, 233; cognitive standardiza-

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