Women's Poetry and Religion in Victorian England: Jewish Identity and Christian Culture

By Cynthia Scheinberg | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4
Christina Rossetti and the Hebraic goblins
of the Jewish Scriptures

“A LINE DRAWN SOMEWHERE”: ROSSETTI AND
THE CONSTRUCTION OF DIFFERENCE

Does it not appear as if the Bible was based upon an understood unalterable distinction between men and women, their position, duties, privileges? Not arrogating to myself but most earnestly desiring to attain to the character of a humble orthodox Xtian, so does it appear to me; not merely under the Old but also under the New Dispensation. The fact of the Priesthood being exclusively man's, leaves me in no doubt that the highest functions are not in this world open to both sexes: and if not all, then a selection must be made and a line drawn somewhere. (Letter, cited in Bell, Christina Rossetti, 111 –12)

When as samples of Old Testament servants of God we select some (since we cannot discuss all), who evidently and eminently have prefigured Christ, at the least in some point of their career, we shall many times find them characterized by that very uncompletedness (if I may term it so: for I mean a very different thing from the defect named incompleteness) which we have been considering. (Christina Rossetti, Seek and Find, 147)

Christina Rossetti (1830–94) is perhaps the most famous and anthologized of all women poets of her day. Cast as the master craftswoman of tightly wrought, highly symbolic poems, the deeply devout spinster, Rossetti carries one of the most powerful reputations of all Victorian women poets, and likewise embodies some of the most stereotypical myths of the Victorian woman artist. 1 Rossetti published four separate books of poetry; in addition her poetry was reprinted in three different collections during her lifetime and countless others after her death. Along with her poetry, Rossetti wrote a number of books designed specifically for children, as well as five books of prose on religious and theological topics, all published by the Society for the Promotion of Christian Knowledge. 2 Though her reputation dropped in the modernist backlash against the Victorians, Rossetti's status in the British literary canon – feminist and otherwise – has never been seriously in doubt,

-106-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women's Poetry and Religion in Victorian England: Jewish Identity and Christian Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 275

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.