Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property

By Wolfram Schmidgen | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I would like to thank three outstanding scholars whose work and advice have been central to what this book is tryingto do. Without Jim Chandler's patience and suggestiveness, Tom Mitchell's insistent clarity, and Paul Hunter's sense of what needed to be done next, much would have been written and argued, but without the same degree of critical reflexiveness. Reflectingthe great institution they work for, all three have been impossibly demandingand impossibly generous. Jim's contribution deserves special emphasis. The things I've learnt from him are beyond countingor accounting.

Many friends and colleagues have provided additional support in this endeavor. I should like to thank the followingfor the sense of belongingthey have given me alongthe way: John Bozaan, Fiona Becket, Ben Bönniger, Shoshannah Cohen, David Fairer, Christa Fischbach, Denis Flannery, Patricia DeMarco, Kristin Hammett, Tracy Hargreaves, Michele Healy, Bob Hellenga, Virginia Hellenga, Vivien Jones, Nance Klehm, Ethan Knapp, Tom Krise, Andrew McRae, Audrey Petty, Henning Schmidgen, John Whale, and David Wright.

Two anonymous readers for Cambridge University Press offered helpful comments on the script; thanks to both of them. Linda Bree, my editor, has been supportive throughout, and her attentive cooperation has eased the transition from manuscript to book. An earlier version of Chapter Six appeared in Studies in the Novel, and I would like to thank the editor for the permission to reprint. The first section of Chapter Four appeared, in slightly different shape, in Eighteenth-Century Studies, and two pages of material from Chapter Three have appeared in ELH.

The final stages in the writing of this book took place in St. Louis, in the company of Beth Landers. She has made everythingnew.

-viii-

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