Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property

By Wolfram Schmidgen | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION
1
Lukács, Geschichte und Klassenbewuβtsein, 372 (my translation).
2
Ibid., 262. Jameson, for example, compares the “relatively natural precapitalist relationship to objects and our own” in Marxism and Form, 394. Goldmann articulates closely related distinctions in Recherche Dialectique, 64–106 (the phrase “économie naturelle” can be found on page 72) and in Towards a Sociology of the Novel, 1–18. The most vivid example for Adorno's tendency to contrast synthetic unity and depraved fragmentation as characteristics of cultural artifacts that resist or yield to capitalist reification can be found in his “ÜUber den Fetischcharakter in der Musik, ” 18, 23, 28–29, 32. As Peter Bürger has shown, such idealizing tendencies can even be found in Adorno's late aesthetic. See Bürger's analysis of Adorno's defense of aesthetic “Schein” in his Zur Kritik der Idealistischen Ästhetik, 59–77.
3
Baudrillard's work of the late 1960s/early 1970s offers a stirringcritique of the Marxist reliance on idealized contrasts between, for instance, use value/exchange value, quality/quantity. Often, however, that critique spins out of control because Baudrillard is too interested in replacinga materialist with a semiological approach. See, for example, The Mirror of Production and For a Critique of the Political Economy of the Sign.
4
Pocock's argument on civic humanism's escape from materialism can be found in Virtue, Commerce, and History, 43–44.
5
Pocock himself indicates that classical republicanism complemented actually existingBritish traditions of landed property. See Virtue, Commerce, and History, 107.
6
I confine myself here to three massive volumes that document the extensive new research in this area: Consumption and the World of Goods, ed. Brewer and Porter; Early Modern Conceptions of Property, ed. Brewer and Staves; and The Consumption of Culture, ed. Bermingham and Brewer.
7
Interestingly enough, Jameson suggests that the best available theoretical model to explain the “intensities” that mark the “waningof affect” in postmodern culture are “older theories of the sublime” — theories, in other words, that assumed new cultural importance in the eighteenth century: Postmodernism, 6; more generally, 1–55.

-218-

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