Modernism and the Ideology of History: Literature, Politics, and the Past

By Louise Blakeney Williams | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION
1
George Dangerfield,The Strange Death of Liberal England (New York: Putnam's, 1980), p. vii.
2
Ibid., p. viii.
3
Ibid.
4
For definitions of Modernism, see Malcolm Bradbury and James McFarlane, eds.,Modernism (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1983); Alistair Davies,An Annotated Critical Bibliography of Modernism (New Jersey: Barnes and Noble, 1982); Sanford Schwartz,The Matrix of Modernism: Pound, Eliot, and Early Twentieth-Century Thought (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1985); Michael H. Levenson,A Genealogy of Modernism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984).
5
Georg Lukàcs, quoted in Irving Howe, “Introduction, ” The Idea of the Modern in Literature and the Arts (New York: Horizon, 1967), p. 17.
6
T. S. Eliot, “Ulysses, Order, and Myth, ” Dial 75 (November 1923): 483; John B. Vickery,The Literary Impact of the Golden Bough (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1973), p. 125; Harvey Gross,The Contrived Corridor: History and Fatality in Modern Literature (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1971), p. 110.
7
See, for example, Gross,Contrived Corridor; James Longenbach,Modernist Poetics of History: Pound, Eliot, and the Sense of the Past (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1987); Jeffrey M. Perl,The Tradition of Return; The Implic it History of Modern Literature (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1984); Frank Kermode,The Sense of an Ending (London: Oxford University Press, 1968); Thomas Whitaker,Swan and Shadow: Yeats's Dialogue with History (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1964); Daniel Perlman,The Barb of Time: On the Unity of Ezra Pound's Cantos (New York: Oxford University Press, 1969).
8
Ford Madox Ford was born Ford Madox Hueffer. He changed his name after the First World War.
9
See John J. Slocum and Herbert Cahoon,A Bibliography of James Joyce 1882– 1941 (London: Rupert Hart-Davis, 1953); B. J. Kirkpatrick,A Bibliography of Virginia Woolf (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1980); Donald Gallup,T. S. Eliot, A Bibliography (New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, 1969).

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