The Hidden History of the Tibetan Book of the Dead

By Bryan J. Cuevas | Go to book overview

Index
abbot(s) of Menmo, as third generation disciple, 122–133 translations by, 20, 23, 145, 147, 150, 151, 153
Abhidharma interpretations, of tantra, 39– 43, 52–53, 67
Abhijña. See Ngonshejen
Ado Könchok Gyeltsen, 131, 141–150, 151
Adrowa Namkha Dorje, 151, 257n.80
afterdeath state, Buddhist negative paths of, 30, 36–37, 107, 223n.25
afterlife Buddist concept of, 39–40, 107 pathways for, 33–38, 69, 132
agendas, for text interpretation, 4–5, 8, 10– 14, 217n.10
“aimless child, ” 87, 109, 237n.32
Akhu Gyatsün, 126
Akhyok, 150
Akya Yongzin. See Yangjen Gawe Lodrö
Ālaka, 37
Amitābha, 91–92
amulets, 110–111
anāgāmin, 41–42, 226n.11
Anagarika Govinda, 9–10, 12, 219n.44
ancestors, paternal, intermediate state link to, 40–42
ancient writings, as core literature, 114–116
animal sacrifice, in funeral rituals, 37
antarābhava, 40, 226n.4. See also intermediate state
antarāparinirvāyin, 41–42, 226n.11
Asian interpretations, 18, 117, 205, 210, 224n.40
assinations, of monks, 168, 182
astrology, in burial rituals, 70–71, 76
authenticity of core text, 114–115 of scriptures, 82–83, 236n.15
authoritative texts, as core text, 115–116
authorship, of core text, 114–115
Avalokiteśvara, 92
awareness, in bardo, 59–60, 63, 114, 193
Azi Sönambum, 145
Back, Dieter Michael, 12–14, 22, 208
Baden, 185
Bar-do thos-grol, 8, 10, 218n.11, 218n.13, 240n.30, 253n.9, 254n.20. See also Great Liberation upon Hearing in the Bardo
bardo experience, 27, 38–39 closing reflections on, 210–215 in funeral interpretations, 32–33, 38, 224n.40 Golden Rosary doctrine of, 54–56 as path of blending, 48, 53, 230n.85 phases/states of, 48–53, 56–57, 62, 72, 74, 231n.106, 231n.116 prayers for guidance, 40, 69–77, 132, 155, 190 tantra developments in, 42–57, 62, 227n.37 teaching-lineages for, 44–47, 52, 120– 133, 228n.56
bardo of becoming, 49, 53, 56–57, 62–63, 226n.1, 230n.84 in Gampodar treasures, 111, 116–118 transmission of, 94–95, 106, 109
bardo of birth, 53
bardo of birth-to-death, 49, 52–53, 56

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The Hidden History of the Tibetan Book of the Dead
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • A Note on Tibetan Words xi
  • 1 - Introduction: the Saga of the Tibetan Book of the Dead 3
  • I - Death and the Dead 25
  • 2 - Beginnings: Funeral Ritual in Ancient Tibet 27
  • 3 - Transitions: the Buddhist Intermediate State 39
  • 4 - From Death to Disposal 69
  • II - Prophecy, Concealment, Revelation 79
  • 5 - Prophecies of the Lotus Guru 81
  • 6 - A Tale of Fathers and Sons 91
  • 7 - The Gampodar Treasures 101
  • 8 - The Third Generation 120
  • III - Traditions in Transformation 135
  • 9 - Traditions in Eastern Tibet 137
  • 10 - Traditions in Central and Southern Tibet 158
  • IV - Text and Consolidation 177
  • 11 - Rikzin Nyima Drakpa, Sorcerer from Kham 179
  • 12 - Conclusion: Manuscripts and Printed Texts 205
  • Notes 217
  • Bibliography 271
  • List of Tibetan Spellings 303
  • Index 312
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