Performance Planning and Review: Making Employee Appraisals Work

By Richard Rudman | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7
DEVELOPING PERFORMANCE

Any system of performance management inevitably focuses on the process of performance planning and review. These are the activities that demand the time and attention of managers and employees and where organisations develop specific procedures and provide special training. Yet, as we have said earlier, what happens in the relatively long gaps between performance discussions is more important to successful performance management than how well we conduct those discussions or complete the accompanying forms.

Unfortunately, the development of employees' performance is often the forgotten aspect of performance management. Perhaps it's because, unlike performance planning and review, there are no procedural requirements or pressures from top management or the human resources department to get reports in by a set date.

But surely there is little point in setting performance targets if employees lack the skills or knowledge to achieve those goals? Similarly, it's hardly helpful to accept that a lack of skills or knowledge is the reason for poor performance without deciding how the employee is going to acquire those competencies for use in the future. Vague promises about sending people on courses are not what performance development involves. At the same time, a need for training is frequently used as an excuse for poor performance. Managers must be able to identify and handle performance problems without always seeing training as both the problem and the solution. They must also understand that performance has to be managed and developed on the job: instances of inadequate performance cannot be left to a oncea-year review but must be dealt with as they occur.

At a wider level, most organisations now recognise the need for continuing review and renewal so that they can respond to new challenges in their environments. In other words, the concept of the learning organisation is now well accepted. For organisations aspiring to that status, the continuing development of performance might be the key factor in the performance management cycle.

The development aspects of performance management are a challenge for most organisations. In the United States, according to a survey

-144-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Performance Planning and Review: Making Employee Appraisals Work
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 218

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.