Conscription and Conflict in the Confederacy

By Albert Burton Moore | Go to book overview

CONSCRIPTION AND CONFLICT IN THE CONFEDERACY

CHAPTER I
THE MILITARY SYSTEM OF THE CONFEDERACY TO APRIL 6, 1862

IMMEDIATELY after the Confederate Government was organized the problem of defense was taken over by the General Government. Probably no government was ever confronted with a greater task. It had to raise an army in the face of the enemy and to establish the productive agencies necessary to equip it and place it in the field. Moreover, it was sure to be embarrassed by the principle of States' rights, and by the fact that volunteers, believing that the war would last only a few months, would not enlist for a long term.

On February 28th, the Provisional Congress passed an act empowering the President to "assume control of all military operations in every State." It also authorized him to receive from the several States all the arms and munitions in their possession, and to receive for a period of twelve months or more, and in such numbers as he deemed necessary, the State troops that might be tendered or that might volunteer by the consent of their States.1 This act was very inadequate, but in view of

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1
These forces, unlimited by law as to numbers, were to be received in organized units. The President was given authority to appoint the general officers. O. R. ser. IV, vol. I, 114-117.

-1-

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