After Calvin: Studies in the Development of a Theological Tradition

By Richard A. Muller | Go to book overview

8
Scholasticism Protestant and Catholic
Francis Turretin on the Object and
Principles of Theology

Scholasticism Protestant and Catholic

During the past several decades, scholars have become more appreciatively aware of the medieval scholastic roots of Protestantism and have begun to gain some appreciation, albeit halting, of the scholastic form of Protestantism that dominated the Protestant universities in the seventeenth century. This awareness implies, in the first place, a development beyond the thesis advanced by Lortz and Bouyer that Protestantism was the effect of the decadent nominalist theology of the later Middle Ages. 1 Scholars such as Heiko Oberman, Bengt H¨gglund, and David Steinmetz have acknowledged much of the continuity but have emphasized the positive character of late medieval thought. 2 Roman Catholic scholarship has produced positive readings of Scotist and nominalist theology, 3 and in the case of Donnelly's analysis of two sixteenth-century Protestant reformers, has noted—contra Lortz and Bouyer—the impact of Thomism on Protestant thought. 4 In the second place, more attention has been paid to the development of “scholastic” patterns in post-Reformation theology, and scholarship has moved considerably beyond the nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century thesis that Lutheranism developed into a “system of justification” while Calvinism moved toward a fully scholastic “predestinarian metaphysic. ” 5 Protestant scholasticism can now be represented as an attempt to produce not a restrictive system centered on a single doctrinal locus but, rather, a technically sophisticated school-theology. It was developed in part for the sake of debating Roman Catholic polemicists like the great Cardinal Bellarmine on the sophisticated level of his own scholasticism and in part for the sake of developing the implications of the Reformers' teaching for a full system of Christian doctrine. 6

The positive side of this development is particularly apparent as Protestantism entered the seventeenth century, in the development of theological prolegomena or loci dealing with the topics of fundamental theology. This topic was not treated by Luther, Calvin, or their contemporaries. When the later generations of Protestant theologians approached the issue of theology as a discipline, they very naturally fell back on the theological prolegomena written by the great scholastics—Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus, Durandus, Thomas of Strasbourg. 7 Whereas we labor to detect the positive influences of such scho-

-137-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
After Calvin: Studies in the Development of a Theological Tradition
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 275

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.