Coping with Life and Death: Jewish Families in the Twentieth Century

By Peter Y. Medding | Go to book overview

Vichy and the Jews: A Past That is Not Past
Richard J. Golsan (ed. ), Memory, the Holocaust, and French Justice: The Bousquet
and Touvier Affairs
. Hanover and London: University Press of New England,
1996. xxxiii + 217 pp.
Lawrence D. Kritzman (ed. ), Auschwitz and After: Race, Culture, and “The Jewish
Question” in France
. New York and London: Routledge, 1995. x + 335 pp.
Lucien Lazare, Rescue as Resistance: How Jewish Organizations Fought the Holo-
caust in France
, trans. Jeffrey M. Green. New York: Columbia University
Press, 1996. xii + 400 pp.
René Rémond, Le “Fichier juif”: Rapport de la commission présidée par René
Rémond au Premier ministre
. Paris: Plon, 1996. 233 pp.
Tzvetan Todorov, A French Tragedy: Scenes of Civil War, Summer 1944, trans. Mary
Byrd Kelly. Hanover and London: University Press of New England, 1996.
xx + 138 pp.
Richard H. Weisberg, Vichy Law and the Holocaust in France. New York: New York
University Press, 1996. xxiii + 447 pp.

In 1988, the French postmodernist philosopher Jean-FranÉois Lyotard originated the concept of “a past that is not past. ” 1 A slightly different version of the phrase gained a wider audience with the 1994 publication of Eric Conan and Henry Rousso's Vichy, un passé qui ne passe pas. The aptness of this notion is confirmed by the impassioned French and worldwide attention given to persistent questions surrounding French behavior during the war. Wartime documents that had been used to track and capture Jews, which the government claimed to have destroyed, have been discovered. Apartments seized from Jews have recently appeared in inventories of government property. French industry is suspected of having produced poison gas for Nazi death chambers. Stolen art has surfaced in French museum collections. The greatest outrage has been produced by the difficulty of bringing to trial four French war criminals (René Bousquet, Jean Leguay, Paul Touvier and Maurice Papon). Government foot-dragging transformed these individuals into symbols of Vichy and heightened the desire for catharsis, which then focused on obtaining convictions. Announcing the death in prison in July 1996 of Touvier, the only Frenchman thus far to have been convicted of crimes against humanity, a major French Jewish weekly entitled its article “Vichy Has Not Finished Dying. ” 2

The case of Touvier, long protected by high echelons of the French Catholic church, reinforced suspicion that Catholic antisemitism contributed to Vichy attitudes, legis-

-235-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Coping with Life and Death: Jewish Families in the Twentieth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Studies in Contemporary Jewry *
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Symposium - Coping with Life and Death: Jewish Families in the Twentieth Century *
  • The Place of Ethnic Identity in the Development of Personal Identity: A Challenge for the Jewish Family 3
  • Notes *
  • Marriage, Americanization and American Jewish Culture, 1900–1920 27
  • Notes *
  • Making Fragmentation Familiar: Barry Levinson's Avalon 49
  • Notes *
  • The Economics of Contemporary American Jewish Family Life 65
  • Notes *
  • Children of Intermarriage: How “jewish”? 81
  • Notes *
  • What Happened to the Extended Jewish Family? Jewish Homes for the Aged in Eastern Europe 128
  • Notes *
  • Cohesion and Rupture: the Jewish Family in East European Ghettos During the Holocaust 143
  • Notes *
  • The “family-Community” Model in Haredi Society 166
  • Notes *
  • We Are All One Bereaved Family: Personal Loss and Collective Mourning in Israeli Society 178
  • Notes *
  • Essays *
  • Evangelists in a Strange Land: American Missionaries in Israel, 1948–1967 195
  • Notes *
  • Balfour's Mission to Palestine: Science, Strategy and Vision in the Inauguration of the Hebrew University 214
  • Notes 228
  • Review Essays *
  • Vichy and the Jews: A Past That is Not Past 235
  • Notes *
  • Mastering the Middle East: Israel in a Regional Context 250
  • Examining the Oslo Process: A First Cut 256
  • Notes *
  • Book Reviews *
  • Antisemitism, Holocaust and Genocide 265
  • Notes *
  • Notes *
  • History and the Social Sciences 281
  • Notes *
  • Notes *
  • Notes *
  • Language, Literature and the Arts 307
  • Notes 309
  • Notes *
  • Religion, Thought and Education 325
  • Notes *
  • Zionism, Israel and the Middle East 339
  • Notes 349
  • Recently Completed Doctoral Dissertations 351
  • Studies in Comtemporary Jewry XV 360
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 361

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.