Public Control of Labor Relations: A Study of the National Labor Relations Board

By D. O. Bowman | Go to book overview

Chapter XVIII. THE REGIONAL OFFICES

A. General

The nature of labor relations, with the Government an active participant, renders a regional type of organization necessary. Well realizing the possibility of employers' descending upon an agency located in Washington without field representation, the Congress contemplated the maintenance of the regional basis for administration of the Wagner Act. This was especially necessary because of the investigatory functions of the Board in complaint and representation cases. The adjustment work carried on by the Board is possible only with local relationships established between the Board, the employers, and employees.

The National Labor Board operated through twenty regional offices, including two subregional offices. This number was in- adequate; and when the first National Labor Relations Board was established the number of offices was increased to twenty-five, including seven subregional offices. The experience indicated that the volume of cases, the pressure in industrial areas, the in- convenience and length of travel, all justified the additional offices. Whereas the National Labor Board had no offices in Baltimore, Milwaukee, or Denver, the first National Labor Rela- tions Board established offices in those cities. When the present Board was created, it established twenty-one regional offices. Al- though reliance was placed upon the experience of the first two Boards, the present Board combined the offices in Newark and New York, in Cincinnati and Toledo, in Portland and Denver. The Denver office was reopened in 1937 after two years' experience and the demands of national labor organizations had indicated the desirability of another region.

The regional offices of the Board were located in the following

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