Online Communication: Linking Technology, Identity, and Culture

By Andrew F. Wood; Matthew J. Smith | Go to book overview

PART II
THE SELF AMONG OTHERS

A generation ago, a communication technology grabbed the nation's interest, and its enthusiasts eagerly incorporated the latest equipment for their systems, adopted quirky aliases for themselves, and spent hour after hour doing nothing more than talking to other enthusiasts. If this behavior seems a lot like the way people behaved when the Internet caught on in the 1990s, it is because there are some intriguing parallels between the previous popularity of Citizen's Band (CB) radio and the recent popularity of the Internet. Although amateur radio broadcasts had been evolving since the late 1940s, its popularity peaked in 1977, when an estimated 11 million Americans were taking to the airwaves broadcasting messages to one another (Drew, 1997). In fact, the film Frequency (Hoblit, 2000) nostalgically recalled the joys of this form of mediated communication. Although there are far fewer CB hobbyists today, people's interest in communicating with others who are not physically present has not diminished. Arguably, the introduction of e-mail into people's professional and personal lives has made such mediated communication an even more frequent occurrence.

Thus, today we can find people adding webcams to their computer systems, rechristening themselves with fanciful pseudonyms, and spending countless hours chatting with people they have never seen nor are likely to see. Yet despite the Internet's popularity, some people question the quality and effects of this latest form of mediated communication in our lives. This part of the book addresses both people's behavior in and the concerns about CMC. We consider behaviors like the creation of identities, the formation of relationships, and the maintenance of virtual communities. But we also address concerns like misrepresentation, hostile messages, and Internet addiction. In short, we discuss a host of issues that involve how individuals affect and are affected by the others they engage through communication.


REFERENCES

Drew, K. (1997, March 20). Breaker, breaker: CB radio is back. Christian Science Monitor, P. 3.

Hoblit, G. (Producer/Director). (2000). Frequency [Motion picture]. New York: New Line Cinema.

-49-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Online Communication: Linking Technology, Identity, and Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Brief Contents vi
  • Detailed Contents vii
  • Preface xiv
  • Part I - The Internet as Social Technology 1
  • Chapter 1 - Using Technology to Communicate in New Ways 3
  • References *
  • Chapter 2 - Understanding How New Communication Technologies Work 29
  • References *
  • Part II - The Self Among Others 49
  • References *
  • Chapter 3 - Forming Online Identities 51
  • References *
  • Chapter 4 - Relating Online 78
  • References *
  • Chapter 5 - Seeking Therapy Online 101
  • References *
  • Chapter 6 - Communicating in Virtual Communities 122
  • References 142
  • Part III - Internet Culture and Critique 145
  • References *
  • Chapter 7 - Rebuilding Corporations Online 147
  • References *
  • Chapter 8 - Accessing the Machine 166
  • References *
  • Chapter 9 - Carving Alternative Spaces 179
  • References *
  • Chapter 10 - Pop Culture and Online Expression 194
  • References *
  • Appendix A - Introduction to Hypertext Markup Language 213
  • Appendix B - Researching the Internet Experience 222
  • References 226
  • Glossary 227
  • Author Index 235
  • Subject Index 240
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 245

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.