Creativity in the Classroom: Schools of Curious Delight

By Alane Jordan Starko | Go to book overview

Chapter 8
Assessing Creativity

Barbara looked across the table at Kenneth's mother, Mrs. Greene. The conference was not going as well as Barbara had hoped. Mrs. Greene was concerned about the difficulties Kenneth was having in some areas, particularly spelling, but did not seem to see the strengths Barbara thought so important. Barbara considered Kenneth one of the most creative students she had ever taught. His comments in class frequently reflected a unique point of view, and his projects, although not always the neatest in the class, almost always included elements Barbara had never considered. Mrs. Greene was unimpressed. “Creative, ” she exclaimed. “I'm not even sure I know what that means. How can you tell he's creative, anyway? In math, lOOd means he did a good job. Can you be lOOd creative? It looks to me as if he's pulling a fast one on you. Kenneth can be pretty tricky. “Barbara didn 't know what to say. How did she know Kenneth was creative? Could she prove it? Should she try?

Barbara's dilemma is not unique. Efforts to assess creativity have been as challenging as the quest to define it. The complex and elusive nature of the construct, combined with limitations in the technology of our measurements, make precise assessment of creativity a daunting task. Yet efforts to enhance creativity in children seem doomed to failure unless we can recognize creativity when it occurs. Allowing these judgments to

-419-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Creativity in the Classroom: Schools of Curious Delight
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Part I - Understanding Creative People and Processes 1
  • Chapter 1 - What is Creativity? 3
  • References *
  • Chapter 2 - Theories and Models of Creativity 29
  • References *
  • Chapter 3 - Creative People 93
  • References *
  • Chapter 4 - Creativity and Talent Development 141
  • References *
  • Part II - Creativity and Classroom Life 175
  • Chapter 5 - Teaching Creative Thinking Skills and Habits 177
  • References *
  • Chapter 6 - Creativity in the Content Areas 259
  • References *
  • Chapter 7 - Motivation, Creativity, and Classroom Organization 357
  • References *
  • Chapter 8 - Assessing Creativity 419
  • References *
  • Appendix - Problem-Finding Lessons 465
  • Author Index 487
  • Subject Index 493
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 499

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.