Disciplining Gender: Rhetorics of Sex Identity in Contemporary U.S. Culture

By John M. Sloop | Go to book overview

FIVE
In Death, a Secret “Finally and Fully Exposed”
Barry Winchell, Calpernia Addams, and the Crystallization of
Gender and Desire

If people insist on appropriating this corpse by locating it definitively within any particular identity category, they must explain away multiple inconsistencies, ambiguities, and ambivalences in self-identification, self-explanation, behavior, and presentation by using concepts of denial, repression, fear, and internalized prejudice and shame that all tend to dismiss the agency of the subject once animated in that dead flesh.

C. Jacob Hale, “Consuming the Living, Dis(re)membering the Dead”

The July 5, 1999, murder of U. S. Army private Barry Winchell at Fort Campbell, near Clarksville, Tennessee, seemed to provide the same narrative elements that surrounded the ongoing Brandon Teena story, at least as retold in Boys Don't Cry. Indeed, given the lengthy “true” accounts presented in Rolling Stone, Time, the Advocate, and the New York Times Magazine, in local newspapers, and on television, and given the film projects that were initiated by Turner Network Television, Showtime (Soldier's Girl), and a number of independent film production companies, 1 it seems clear that the “gender trouble” of this case, much like that of the Brandon Teena case, piqued the interest of a wide variety of people, raising multiple questions concerning gender and sexuality. That the story was indeed rehearsed through a number of different narrative frames, and that a number of sometimes contradictory positions emerged with regard to numerous elements of the case— especially the “meaning” of the two main characters, Barry Winchell and Calpernia Addams—makes this a story ripe for critical analysis. Again, in light of the obviously gender-troubling elements of the case, its wide coverage, and its partial location within the hypermasculine context of the U. S. Army, it is clearly a site for critical intervention, for

-123-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Disciplining Gender: Rhetorics of Sex Identity in Contemporary U.S. Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 189

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.