Festivals of Freedom: Memory and Meaning in African American Emancipation Celebrations, 1808-1915

By Mitch Kachun | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

In a project that has been in progress for nearly ten years, I have of course incurred intellectual and personal debts too numerous to list. Colleagues, university administrators, library and archive personnel, students, friends, and family members have all helped make the completion of this project possible.

I would like to thank Michael Kammen, Robert L. Harris Jr., and Nick Salvatore at Cornell University for their unflagging support and patience during early stages of this project; their comments and criticisms invariably steered me toward more intellectually challenging engagements with both my sources and my interpretations. Their guidance and friendship have continued through the years since I left Ithaca. I also owe thanks to others from Cornell's History Department, especially R. Laurence Moore, David Sabean, and Margaret Washington, each of whom added immensely to my appreciation for the discipline of historical study. My cohort of graduate students at Cornell provided a collegial atmosphere for the exchange of both ideas and lamentations as we wended our way through various intellectual, personal, and bureaucratic crises.

Administrators and staff at Southeast Community College in Lincoln, Nebraska, provided support for further research and development of this project far beyond what might be expected from a teaching institution. Special thanks to Richard Ross, Sharon Hanna, and Barbara Tracy for their

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Festivals of Freedom: Memory and Meaning in African American Emancipation Celebrations, 1808-1915
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Festivals of Freedom *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - Foundations, 1808–1834 16
  • Chapter Two - Maturation, 1834–1862 54
  • Chapter Three - Expansion and Fragmentation, 1862–1870s 97
  • Chapter Four - Remembrance and Amnesia, 1870s–1910s 147
  • Chapter Five - Reorientation, 1860s–1900s 175
  • Chapter Six - Contestation in Washington, D. C., 1860s–1900s 207
  • Chapter Seven - Dissolution, 1900–1920 233
  • Notes 261
  • Bibliography 303
  • Index 327
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