Conflict, Contradiction, and Contrarian Elements in Moral Development and Education

By Larry Nucci | Go to book overview

9
Race and Morality:
Shaping the Myth
William H. Watkins
University of Illinois at Chicago

Morality continues to be an emotional hot-button issue in America's culture wars. Many see our nation in decline as they rekindle images of Babylon, the Roman Empire, and other “decadent” societies. For the general public, morality is most often associated with the erosion of the core values that made us “great. ” We have all heard that frugality, sobriety, piety, and chastity have given way to sloth, greed, and carnality. In the Western world this may be an eternal debate, as every generation demonstrates concern and fear that the young have abandoned the values of their forefathers.

Beyond those issues, our highly stratified industrial society faces other moral concerns with profound social consequences. An ethnically and racially heterogeneous society demands accommodation among diverse people if it is to function. The plague of racism, ethnocentrism, and prejudice remain deeply embedded in U. S. history and culture. Serious and organized public discourse on racism is mostly lacking or absent.

Powerful political and religious groups are demanding that schools increasingly participate in moral “uplift. ” The concerns of the fundamentalists and “hard” right focus mostly on character. Although some character-building initiatives are being integrated into the curriculum, there is little meaningful excavation of problems on race and privilege. Sponsored school multiculturalism (Watkins, 1994) has done little to ameliorate hardened attitudes. Public education has substituted gimmicky schemes of diversity and

-173-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Conflict, Contradiction, and Contrarian Elements in Moral Development and Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 223

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.