The Moral Media: How Journalists Reason about Ethics

By Lee Wilkins; Renita Coleman | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 9
Teaching Journalists About Ethics:
What This Study Suggests

IS IT FUTILE?

A consistent and potentially discouraging finding in the multiple studies that represent this research is that when asked directly participants said that their university-level training in ethics made no difference in how they thought about professional problems. Instead, they focused on the importance of professional socialization. The statistical analyses support this conclusion.

Although it is important to acknowledge these findings, we also believe a deeper reading of the data, coupled with our own professional experience as journalists, suggest a more sanguine interpretation. Ethical journalists were those professionals who had a strong internal sense of the appropriate professional choices. In many instances, that strong internal sense had to act as counterweight to a professional environment—the same environmental that journalists credited with influencing their decisions. What should readers and journalism students make of these two claims?

First, we have no doubt that in this study of journalists, as in many others beginning with the seminal study “Newsroom Socialization” (Breed, 1955) and continuing through work such as Custodians of Conscience (Ettema & Glasser, 1998), the workplace clearly establishes norms and, at its best, promotes ethical discussion. When working journalists say that their professional environment influences them, there is substantial empirical evidence to support this claim. What is less clear is the mental mechanism that journalists and advertising practitioners bring to evaluate the ethical import of what goes on in the workplace. Yet, it is clear—again from scholarly studies, such as Good Work (Gardner et al, 2001)—that professionals are engaged in such an evaluation.

-127-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Moral Media: How Journalists Reason about Ethics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 164

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.