Handbook of Parenting - Vol. 3

By Marc H. Bornstein | Go to book overview

20
Psychoanalysis and Parenthood
Bertram J. Cohler
Susan Paul
University of Chicago

INTRODUCTION

Parenthood is both one of the most central of adult social roles and also a subjective experience endowed with particular meanings fashioned over a lifetime. Although a couple may anticipate and plan for the first birth and the transition to parenthood, evidence from studies of the transition to parenthood suggests that prospective parents cannot fully anticipate the significance of caring for the baby (Bibring, 1959). Furthermore, as the psychoanalyst Therese Benedek (1973) observed, once a woman or man has become a parent, one is a parent as long as there is memory; Benedek also suggests that even following the years of active parenting, mothers and fathers continue to feel particular responsibility and affection for their offspring. Across the course of life, parents continue to induct their offspring into new roles through forward socialization just as offspring continue through backward socialization to influence parental conceptions of self and management of such adult roles as being parents of yong adults. This process of continued reciprocal socialization across the course of adult life is experienced by both parents and offspring in ways shaped by their own conceptions of self, their unique life history and accompanying memories and hopes, and living in a particular time and place.

In this chapter we consider parenthood across the course of adult life from the dual perspective of psychoanalysis and the contemporary social context of adult lives in the United States. While acknowledging the many satisfactions of being a parent, parents in contemporary society all too often experience feelings of role strain, overload, and conflict (Cohler, 1985). More than four decades ago, an ethnographic and comparative cross-cultural study showed that parenthood was a greater source of both anxiety and hostility for American parents as contrasted with those in the six other cultures around the world for whom comparative data were available (Fischer and Fischer, 1963; Minturn and Lambert, 1964). This anxiety regarding being a competent parent is also reflected in the preoccupation of parents in our society with guides and primers regarding childcare and with feelings of responsibility for how children “turn out” as adults (Clarke-Stewart, 1978; Ryff, Schmutte, and Lee, 1996).

-563-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook of Parenting - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents of Volume 3: Being and Becoming a Parent vii
  • Preface xi
  • Contents of Volume 1: Children and Parenting xv
  • Contents of Volume 2: Biology and Ecology of Parenting xvii
  • Contents of Volume 4: Social Conditions and Applied Parenting xix
  • Contents of Volume 5: Practical Issues in Parenting xxi
  • About the Authors in Volume 3 xxv
  • Part I - The Parent 1
  • 1 - Mothering 3
  • References *
  • 2 - Fathers and Families 27
  • References *
  • 3 - Coparenting in Diverse Family Systems 75
  • References *
  • 4 - Single Parenthood 109
  • References *
  • 5 - Grandparenthood 141
  • References *
  • 6 - Adolescent Parenthood 173
  • References *
  • 7 - Nonparental Caregiving 215
  • References *
  • 8 - Sibling Caregiving 253
  • References *
  • 9 - Parenting in Divorced and Remarried Families 287
  • References 310
  • 10 - Lesbian and Gay Parenthood 317
  • References *
  • 11 - Parenting and Contemporary Reproductive Technologies 339
  • References *
  • Part II - Becoming and Being a Parent 361
  • 12 - The Transition to Parenting 363
  • References *
  • 13 - Stages of Parental Development 389
  • References *
  • 14 - Personality and Parenting 415
  • References *
  • 15 - Parents' Knowledge and Expectations: Using What We Know 439
  • References *
  • 16 - Parental Monitoring and Knowledge of Children 461
  • References *
  • 17 - Parent Beliefs Are Cognitions: the Dynamic Belief Systems Model 485
  • References *
  • 18 - Parental Attributions 509
  • References *
  • 19 - Parental Attitudes Toward Childrearing 537
  • References 559
  • 20 - Psychoanalysis and Parenthood 563
  • References *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 599

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.